Thursday, May 4, 2017

The Guide to Bushi No Te Kicking


It occurs to me there is a great deat regarding kicking I have used in my program. So here are some accumulated ideas about use of the foot to consider.

 

Of course this is not complete, but I think it will be helpful.

 

 

“Keri” not “Geri”

 

Recently discovering those notes on the Advanced kicking drills I created quite some time ago has gotten me thinking about the training I’ve experienced in kicking in the arts.

 

A number of different incidents come to mind.

 

My introduction to Joe Swift on the inter-net almost began with him explaining to me the difference between use of Keri and Geri for kicking. The correct Japanese term for kick is “Keri” but when it is in a compound like roundhouse kick (mawashi-geri) it is “Geri”. As a standalone word “Geri” means ‘diarrhea’. An important distinction if you’re trying to make a point in Japanese I guess.  [Actually I’ve found many books going both ways, which make the point about  authors not knowing Japanese using Japanese terms.]

 

The superb kicking technique of Shimabuku Tatsuo on his films. They remain the most impressive detail I’ve seen of his technique.

 

Taking a seminar in the mid 1970’s with Bill Wallace, and watching very good regional black belts become helpless trying to stop his kicking combinations, even when he told them before hand what he was throwing. He didn’t gain the nickname “Superfoot” for nothing.

 

Seeing a preliminary fight to the Middle Weight championships between Butch Bell and Kasim Dubar, where one opponent tried a low block on a Bando stylists shin kick and broke his arm. That incident also almost cost Kasim Dubar his life, for the Doctor was treating the broken arm during his middleweight fight and wasn’t present ringside when Bell destroyed him and only the quick resuscitation of the referee kept him alive.

 

Watching Rick Roufus the other night fighting Mike Malone. From the fight it looked like the roundhouse kick to Rick’s leg took their toll and he was unable to keep standing to compete in a run-off round. The joys of full contact competition, who can break down the other’s leg first.

 

Mr. Lewis’ green belts winning fights with spinning back kicks in the opponents mouth, with perfect control, as soon as the judge shouting “Hajime” and the opponent never moved one inch.

 

The Korean Young Tigers TKD team demonstrating their jumping front kicks 9 feet in the air, using two partners hunched over each other on the floor as a springboard to launch themselves up as a trampoline.

 

A whole lot of kicking going on, and of course there are many, many more incidents I remember.  This resurrects why I created this set of kicking drills and the wide range of kicking practices I’ve studied over the years.

 

I’d like to discuss my history on the art of kicking and then the choices I began to make how to develop these skills in my own students.


 

Among the specific drills I have used are these. One is not more valuable than the others, each have specific strengths.

 


 


 

 


 

 

Among the most advanced drill we use is Kihon Ni Dan which came from the art of Tristan Sutrisno

 

 

Other drills

 

Use of advanced kicking drills to develop self defense skills using the lower body is but one more step on a long sequence of training. These kicking drills require a much more advanced timing to execute properly, as well as being rather dangerous to the person you’re kicking.

 

All are against an attacker stepping with their right and throwing a right strike.

 

The defender is in natural (parallel) stance facing 12 o’clock.

 

Pivoting on the left foot (on the ball of the foot), the right foot steps in (interior line of defense) and you turn to 9 o’clock with a right inside open hand parry. The right foot sweeps in with your heel behind their front ankle, at that point you execute a right scoop kick to 6 o’clock. This has the effect of allowing your attacker to practice their split stretch.

 

Pivoting on the right foot (on the ball of the foot), the left foot steps in (exterior line of defense) and you turn to 3 o’clock with a left inside open hand parry. The left foot sweeps in with your heel behind their front ankle, at that point you execute a left scoop kick to 6 o’clock. Same effect as No. 1.

 

As they attack, step back with your right foot and execute a left open hand outer parry (as from Seisan kata), then throw a right front kick into the left inner thigh of the attacker and immediately follow with a right cutting kick (the inward striking kick from Nihanchi Kata) to the back of the attacker’s right knee. This is a 1-2 kicking motion with the right foot.

 

As they attack, step back with your right foot and execute a left open hand outer parry (as from Seisan kata), then throw a right squat kick to their left lower ribs, and immediately follow with right inside stomp to the back of the attacker’s right knee. This is a 1-2 kicking motion with the right foot.

 

As they attack, step back with your right foot and execute a left open hand outer parry (as from Seisan kata), then throw a right turning side kick to 12 o’clock into their stomach. Put the foot down (the right toes facing 6 o’clock) and then turn to the left and throw a left side kick to 12 o’clock into their stomach.  Put the foot down (left toes facing 12 o’clock) and finish with a right outside crescent kick to their head.

 

For the athletically inclined, as they attack, step back with your right foot and execute a left open hand outer parry (as from Seisan kata), then throw a right turning side kick to 12 o’clock into their stomach followed by a left turning and jumping side kick into their stomach.

 

From the parallel stance, your right foot circles forward clockwise, to hook your right heel behind their right heel (exterior line of defense). As the right leg hooks in you bump them forward off balance and then throw a right front kick into their supporting leg or groin.

 

From the parallel stance, your left foot circles forward counter-clockwise, to hook your left heel behind their right heel (interior line of defense). As the left leg hooks in you bump them forward off balance and then throw a left front kick into their supporting leg or groin.

 

The Left foot steps to the outside of the attack as the right hand parries the attacking arm from the outside. Follow this with a right hook kick to the attacker’s kidneys. This can be followed with a right roundhouse kick to their abdomen (or alternately a right side kick to their right knee from the outside). Admittedly, the follow up kick is more a drill than an necessity or practical response.

 

The Left foot steps to the outside of the attack as the right hand parries the attacking arm from the outside. Follow this with a right roundhouse kick to the abdomen and then a right hook kick to the kidneys.

 

From a parallel stance, throw a left ¾ front side kick to the inside of the attacker’s right knee.

 

For those who are very athletic (borrowed from my Tang Soo Do training),  The Left foot steps to the outside of the attack as the right hand parries the attacking arm from the outside. Follow this with a right hook kick to the attacker’s head over the top of their arm, followed by a right roundhouse kick to their head.

 

The Left foot steps deep to the outside of the attack as the right hand parries the attacking arm from the outside. Follow this with a right crescent kick to the attacker’s head from their rear, followed by a right stomping low side kick to the attackers left knee (from behind). For this sequence you’ve moved past them and are kicking them from the side and behind.

 

The Left foot steps deep to the outside of the attack as the right hand parries the attacking arm from the outside. Follow this with a right heel kick to their groin (from behind them). Essentially you’ve moved past them with your initial stepping and for the right groin kick your right leg circles up to be behind them, you raise the heel to rake into their groin, and the right foot moves counter-clockwise raking motion up into the groin from the front to the rear. This is not a response most expect.

 

Pivoting on the left foot (from parallel stance) the right foot spins to the rear 180 degrees clockwise (outside the attackers arm) (you are now facing 6 o’clock). Your left foot rakes back and up (in a clockwise motion) into their groin (from their front) raking the heel from back to front.

 

Pivoting on the left foot (from parallel stance) the right foot executes a right outer crescent kick (from the exterior of the attackers arm), then pivoting on the right foot which is placed down, you throw a left inside spinning crescent kick to their head or back (spine).

 

The Left foot steps to the outside of the attack, and then pivot on the left to spin clockwise with a right inside hook kick to the attackers rear knee from behind (or to their head from behind).

 

The Left foot steps to the outside of the attack to set up a right side kick to the attacker’s knee followed by a right roundhouse kick to the abdomen/groin.


 



 

Charlie Murray informs me that Mr. Lewis’ Lower Body Chart has always included front heel thrust kicks and side heel thrust kicks from the floor, and I still teach that way.

 

With Charles visit for the first time for him, Mike Cassidy had the kids working a drill he developed years ago. You might find this useful.

1.       You fall down and shift to your resting on your elbows Your feet curled up at your groin

2.       Front heel thrust kick from the floor

3.       Roll over to your right side and curl you feet at your groin

4.       Left Side heel thrust kick from the floor

5.       (optional) roll over to the left, scissoring your legs (which is also a tripping motion where one foot hooks behind the attacker’s foot and the other side kicks their leg at the same time making the trap.)

6.       (optional)  right side thrust kick from the floor

7.       Rise to one knee (On knee on the floor)

8.       Use the knee for a jump knee strike

9.       Finish using the other foot for a front kick (8 and 9 together are a jump front kick)






 

INDEX

 

Bushi No Te Isshinryu Kicking techniques

 

Note; most of the following kicks work to a wide range of targets of opportunity. Nor are the set up techniques described, nor angles of entry, etc.

 

Isshinryu basics

 

Rear Front Snap Kick (front) ball of foot

Rear Front Snap Kick (side) ball of foot

Front Front Thrust Kick (front) heel thrust knee high

Rear Front Snap Kick (front) ripping toe kick

Rear Front Thrust Kick (on the floor on your back) - heel

Side Snap Kick knee height 45 degrees front – blade of foot

Side Snap Kick knee height to side – blade of foot

Side Snap Kick knee height 45 degrees rear – blade of foot

Side Thrust Kick (on the floor on your side) – heel

Bottom foot hooks behind leg and Top foot Side Thrust Kick to the knee (on the floor on your side)

Cross Kick (stomp) – heel

Cross Kick (stomp) - instep

Crescent Kick Inner (front) – shin

Crescent Kick Inner (front) - instep

Knee Strike to front

Knee Strike to front cat chambered first

Rear Kick with heel (foot vertical) to groin

Jump Knee Strike then Opposite Jump Front Kick – ball of the foot

Double Jump Front Kick – ball of the foot

Step to Side Squat Kick (roundhouse kick 45 degrees off the floor) – ball of the foot

Roundhouse Kick (old style) ball of the foot

Roundhouse Kick (new style) ball of the foot

Back corner side kick with one foot followed by a rear kick with the other foot

Back corner side kick with one foot followed by rear kick with the same foot

 

Isshinryu advanced

 

stepping – on top of opponents foot / stomping

stepping – hooking behind on the interior line of defense

stepping – hooking behind on the exterior line of defense

stepping – stepping on the opponents instep

stepping – hurried stomping on the opponents instep

stepping – sweep

stepping – inner knee check/thrust

Front Kick – striking behind the calf on a returning heel

Front Kick – shin kick to the inner thigh

Front Kick – instep kick with the ball of the foot

Front Kick – striking with the inside ball as the foot retracts

Naifanchi – inner foot slice to inside of leg

Naifanchi – cross foot slice to front of leg – inside to outside

Naifanchi – cross foot slice to front of leg – outside to inside

Naifanchi – outside ball of foot reverse round strike to outer calf

 

Other kicking

Front Kicks top of the foot

Round Kicks top of the foot

Ankle Kicking with Toes in shoes (Tam Tuie)

Inner Leg Toe Kicking with Shoes (Tam Tuie)

Outer Leg Toe Kicking with Shoes (Tam Tuie)

Lower Abdomen Toe Kicking with Shoes (Tam Tuie)

Uechi style Toe Kicks

On Floor, rolling scissors to leg – trap – takedown

from Seiza – front thrust kick and return to Seiza

Outer Crescent Kick

Reverse Roundhouse Kick


 

 

Jumping Front Front Kick

Jumping Outer Crescent Kick

Jumping Inner Crescent Kick

Jumping Outer Front Crescent Kick followed by Jumping Inner Rear Crescent Kick

Jumping Inner Rear Crescent kick followed by Jumping Inner Front Crescent Kick

Step and Crescent Kick

Rear Side Kick above waist to front with heel toes angled down

Front Side Kick above waist to front with heel toes angled down

Back Turning Rear Kick

Back Turning Side Kick

Back Turning Inside Round Kick

Back Turning Outside Crescent Kick

Back Turning Jumping Rear Outside Crescent Kick followed by turning Inside Crescent Kick

Back Turning Jumping Knee followed by turning Inside Crescent Kick

Axe Kick (heel striking outside crescent kick)

Back Turning Jumping Axe Kick

Turn away – drop to  knee and place both hands on the floor – rear foot back turning side kick from the kneeling position – return kicking foot to original position – rotate and stand to original position

Spinning Wheel Kick

Turn away – drop to knee, and place both hands on the floor – spin counter-clockwise with a wheel kick (calf high)

 

Sparring kicks

 

The normal range of sparring kicking and combinations

 

Specific Combinations

 

Cross over stomp kick followed by front kick with the other leg

Front Shin Kick followed by Rear Shin Kick

Rear front Thrust to inner thigh and retract with cut kick to inside of other knee

Squat Kick to outside ribs and follow with cross stomping kick on their inner knee

Step in and Swing Kick directly to rear hooking their ankle

Step outside and Swing Kick directly to the rear hooking their ankle

Back Side Kick to Front follow with back turning side kick to the front then place foot down and rear leg outer crescent kick

Step Past the attacker and rear leg chamber heel pawing strike to groin

 

Ghost Techniques

 

Private range of Chinese lower body maneuvers for evasion and turning using the stepping as an attack

 

Kicking Drills

 

A very wide range of kicking drills cumulating with an exceptional kicking exercise

 It is also appropriate to note these studies occurred over 3 decades of training. They are not a short term study, rather a study for accumulated experiences.

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