Friday, October 24, 2014

Anatomy of the carotid sinus nerve and surgical implications in carotid sinus syndrome.




The strike to the carotid sinus does not shut down the brain, what it does do is stop the heart from beating as the strike increases the blood pressure and the heart stops to reduce the blood pressure. Especially in older people this might kill. The difficult to read lower articles go into detail.






Anatomy of the carotid sinus nerve and surgical implications in carotid sinus syndrome.



Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The carotid sinus syndrome (CSS) is characterized by syncope and hypotension due to a hypersensitive carotid sinus located in the carotid bifurcation. Some patients ultimately require surgical sinus denervation, possibly by transection of its afferent nerve (carotid sinus nerve [CSN]). The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomy of the CSN and its branches.

METHODS:

Twelve human carotid bifurcations were microdissected. Acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) staining was used to identify location, side branches, and connections of the CSN.

RESULTS:

A distinct CSN originating from the glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve was identified in all specimens. A duplicate CSN was incidentally present (2/12). Mean CSN length measured from the hypoglossal (XII) nerve to the carotid sinus was 29 +/- 4 mm (range, 15-50 mm). The CSN was frequently located on anterior portions of the internal carotid artery, either laterally (5/12) or medially (6/12). Separate connections to pharyngeal branches of the vagus (X) nerve (6/12), vagus nerve itself (3/12), sympathetic trunk (2/12), as well as the superior cervical ganglion (2/12) were commonly observed. The CSN always ended in a network of small separate branches innervating both carotid sinus and carotid body.

CONCLUSION:

Anatomical position of the CSN and its side branches and communications is diverse. From a microanatomical standpoint, CSN transection as a single treatment option for patients with CSS is suboptimal. Surgical denervation at the carotid sinus level is probably more effective in CSS.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Some patients suffering from CSS ultimately require surgical carotid sinus denervation, possibly by transection of its afferent nerve (CSN). This study was performed to investigate the anatomy of the CSN using a nerve-specific ACHE staining technique. Microdissection demonstrated a great variability of the CSN and its branches. Simple high transection of the CSN may lead to an incomplete sinus denervation in patients with CSS. Surgical denervation at the level of the carotid sinus itself may be more effective in CSS.

Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE): Quality-assessed Reviews.

Carotid sinus nerve blockade to reduce blood pressure instability following carotid endarterectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis


Review published: 2007.

Bibliographic details: Tang T Y, Walsh S R, Gillard J H, Varty K, Boyle J R, Gaunt M E.  Carotid sinus nerve blockade to reduce blood pressure instability following carotid endarterectomy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery 2007; 34(3): 304-311. [PubMed]

Abstract


OBJECTIVES: Local anaesthetic infiltration into the carotid sinus during carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been recommended to minimise blood pressure fluctuations but its use remains controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether intra-operative administration of local anaesthetic reduces the incidence of haemodynamic instability following CEA.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A search of the Medline, Pubmed and Embase databases and the Current Controlled Trials register identified four trials, which met the pre-defined inclusion criteria for data extraction. Pooled odds ratios with 95 per cent confidence intervals (c.i.) for the development of post-operative hypotension and hypertension were calculated using a random-effects model.

RESULTS: Outcomes of 432 patients were studied. Local anaesthetic blockade of the carotid sinus was associated with a pooled odds ratio of 1.25 (95 per cent c.i. 0.496 to 3.15); p=0.216) and 1.28 (95 per cent c.i. 0.699 to 2.33; p=0.428) for the development of post-operative hypotension and hypertension respectively. Although none reach significance there was a trend towards increased risk of developing a complication in those patients who received local anaesthetic.

CONCLUSIONS: There are insufficient data to determine the role of intra-operative local anaesthetic administration in reducing post-operative blood pressure lability following CEA. Conversely, the possibility of harm cannot be excluded on the basis of the currently available data.

 

David Evseeff's book on Isshinryu Karate lists Isshinryu Karate-Do Formal Upper Body Techniques

I always thought this technique listing was interesting.


David Evseeff's book on Isshinryu Karate lists "Isshinryu Karate-Do Formal Upper Body   Ippon Kumite Techinques", but doesn't credit the source.

Listing from David's book.

1. Inside Block, reverse punch (solar plexus)
2. Inside Block, reverse uppercut.
3. Inside block, reverse punch
4. Outside block, reverse punch
5. Outside block, reverse twist punch (head)
6. Open-hand upper block, nukite strike (throat/eyes)
7. Inside reverse forearm block and grab, inside spin, elbow strike
(solar plexus)
8. Outside reverse forearm block and grab, outside spin, elbow
strike (kidney)
9. Step into attack (horse stance), lunge punch
10. Inside block, "Chinto pivot", reverse haito (throat)
11. Outside cross-body block, "Chinto pivot", reverse haito (throat)
12. Outside shotei block, step into opponent, reverse multiple haito
strikes (groin)
13. Inside haito block and pull, reverse punch (solar plexus)
14. Haito cross-body block and pull, reverse twist punch
(neck/mastoid process)
15. Step into attack, outside upper forearm block, reverse punch
(face/throat)
16. Step into attack, inside upper forearm block, reiken strike
(face/throat)
17. "Kusanku sidestep" avoidance, "Chinto pivot", reverse punch (head)
18. Inside reinforced block, reverse reiken (head)
19. Outside reinforced block, upper cut (head)
20. Outside cross-body haito block, pull away, escape.
21. Outside reverse cross-body shotei block, reverse grab, reverse tettsui (throat)

22. Outside cross-body shotei block, reverse grab, lunge reiken (head)

23. Outside cross-body shotei block, reverse grab, elbow strike (head/throat)

24. Inside block, step in, post head, eye gouge

25. Drop to knee, reverse punch (groin)

26. Cross-body shotei block, reverse punch (head)

27. Rising head block, reverse punch (solar plexus)

28. Rising head block, lung reiken (face/throat)

29. Shotei cross-body block (stepping into a horse stance), double hook punch

30. Inverted outside forearm block, reiken strike (face/throat)

31. Inverted inside forearm block, reiken strike (forearm/head)

32. Outside Shotai block, “Chinto pivot”, haito strike (head/throat)

33. Hip reinforced empi block, reiken strike.

34. High kiai, lunge punch (head)

35. Double inside rising haito block, double eye gouge.

36. Double inside rising block, double hand head grab, head strike.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Quick Anatomy Referance

This is meant to be a quick Anatomy Reference to assist you to finding more information using google or bing search.






Sunday, October 12, 2014

Itoman's Triangle Flying ?


Time does seem to fly, it has been several decades when one day the brown belt, Young Lee, after class took a run up a wall and delivered a kick. Something he saw in a movie and wanted to learn. Of course he practiced it, and other students did too. Several months later attending a summer camp, during a break in the training he took off on the wet grass, ran up a nearby tree and kicked. Then another brown belt, Andrew Ware, did the same. After several successful kicks others at the camp, so inclined, started trying to do the same. Trying and falling, sliding on the wet grass, discovering it wasn’t  so easy.

 

No, this has not been a part of class, though I often have drills to slake the energy of teenage students (such as a version of Naifanchi incorporating jumping crescent kicks. But this was individual initiative.





Then reading Itoman Seijin (Morinobu’s) book Toudi-jutsu no Kenkyu I found that there was a similar kicking technique in Toudi.  Triangle Flying - This technique involves jumping or leaping to three points. That is, you use the footing from a wall, tree stump or the ground to deliver a kick, move to an advantageous position, or move to safe distance using three points. “

 

So we didn’t come up with something new, just re-invented the wheel so to speak. The texture that Itoman describes as Toudi is very rich in perhaps lost techniques such as this. Much more environmental focused than today’s dojo Karate, or so I conjecture.

 

Toudi-jutst no Kenkyo Itoman Seijn

Itoman Seijin (Morinobu’s) book Toudi-jutsu no Kenkyu

 

This incredible work has been made available to us through the efforts of Mario Mckenna who has translated it into English. To give an overview or Toudi-jutsu I wish to share the table of contents for the book.

Contents

Preface...................................................................................................................... 2

Flowing about into any one of the six places...................................................... 4

Fundamentals........................................................................................................... 5

What is the Military Way........................................................................................ 5

An Outline of the Development of Combative Technique and Equipment... 8

The History of Boxing.............................................................................................. 9

The Development of Toudi.................................................................................. 12

The Military Ethics of Toudi................................................................................. 16

Things to Bear in Mind when Learning Toudi................................................... 18

Use of the Mind, Will & Spirit in Military Arts.................................................. 20

Notes on the Policy of the Prohibition of Weapons........................................ 22

Grades in Toudi...................................................................................................... 23

How Toudi is Organized........................................................................................ 24

Offence and Defense........................................................................................... 26

Toudi Techniques.................................................................................................. 26

Offensive, Defensive & Protective Techniques............................................... 29

Toudi Kata............................................................................................................... 68

Position of Vital Points........................................................................................ 100

Strategy................................................................................................................. 106

Military Tactics..................................................................................................... 106

The Way of Opposites........................................................................................ 108

Techniques of Cheating and Deception.......................................................... 110

Controlling Space and Using External Objects............................................... 112

Conclusion............................................................................................................ 114

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

When Joe Swift was the Uke


Joe-san Swift is my earliest friend on the internet. Years ago he even visited Derry one day. I’ve had this article on Koju-Ryu from a Japanese magazine from about 2003.  The author was Mizuguchi Rakuya, editor in chief of the Karate-do Monthly magazine, and features Hayashi Shingo Sensei, the last known teacher of Kojo-ryu..

While I do not have a translation of the article. The photos clearly show Joe-san taking the beating. And there is a relationship to Isshinryu useage. Not that Isshinryu has any kinship to the rare Koju system.












This is shared with Joe Swift’s permission. Joe  was originally an Isshinryu black belt and over years studied Mushikan in Kanazawa ,besides his profession in Weather Casting he is currently the head instructor of the Tokyo Mushikan http://tokyo-mushinkan.com/WhoWeAre.html  and has trained with many instructors in Okinawa and Japan. He has made frequent appearances on Japanese television, and a participant in several Japanese magazine articles. He has friends around the world frequently sharing articles and translations, has been a frequent contributor to FightingArts.con and many other places. He has also translated works for many Japanese and Okinawan authors.  

 

A true Renissance Man through his interests.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Brown Belt and Sho Dan Standards


The purpose to having standards for our dojo, is not to have perfect goals. Rather these are the standards we expect each student during Brown Belt training, and Sho Dan training to pass through on their journey forward. If there is a goal the standards should always be improving.

 

From 1989 we have

 

            Kata Sho - Group
            Kata Ananku  -  Mike Cassidy
            Kata Seisan  - Young Lee
            Yellow Belt Te Wazza – Mike and Young
            Kata Saifa - Mike Cassidy
            Kata Seiunchin – Young Lee
            Kata Nihanchi – Mike Cassidy
            Kata Wansu – Young Lee
            Blue Belt Keri Wazza – Mike and Young
            Kata Chinto – Mike and Young
            Kobudo Kata – Tokumine No Kon – Mike Cassidy
            Kobudo Kata – Brown Belt version of the Bando Hidden Stick

           

This film was made before they studied Kusanku, Sunsu or Sanchin. While our standards have changed from that time somewhat, this is an accurate picture of expected Brown Belt development.

And I have a video of the youth performing the first 6 of the Aiki wazza. Aikido study begins at brown belt.
 

 

From 1991 we shift into Sho Dan standards.

 
           One of the individual practices Running up the wall and kicking – Young Lee
            Kata Kusanku – Mike Cassidy
            Kata Nijushiho – Young Lee
            Kata SunNuSu (Sunsu) – Andrew Ware
            Kobudo Kata Urashie No Bo – Mike Cassidy
            Optional Black Belt kata study – Sutrisno family Gojushiho – Young Lee
            Optional Black Belt Chinese Form Study – form Pai Lum Kuen – Andrew Ware

 
 
 
Then there are the Black Belt Keri Wazza, some of which are:
 

 
 
 
This is not the full range of our studies, but contains many of them.
 
By referring to these past performances we can be reminded of where we want to go as we proceed in the future.