Thursday, October 16, 2014

Quick Anatomy Referance

This is meant to be a quick Anatomy Reference to assist you to finding more information using google or bing search.






Sunday, October 12, 2014

Itoman's Triangle Flying ?


Time does seem to fly, it has been several decades when one day the brown belt, Young Lee, after class took a run up a wall and delivered a kick. Something he saw in a movie and wanted to learn. Of course he practiced it, and other students did too. Several months later attending a summer camp, during a break in the training he took off on the wet grass, ran up a nearby tree and kicked. Then another brown belt, Andrew Ware, did the same. After several successful kicks others at the camp, so inclined, started trying to do the same. Trying and falling, sliding on the wet grass, discovering it wasn’t  so easy.

 

No, this has not been a part of class, though I often have drills to slake the energy of teenage students (such as a version of Naifanchi incorporating jumping crescent kicks. But this was individual initiative.





Then reading Itoman Seijin (Morinobu’s) book Toudi-jutsu no Kenkyu I found that there was a similar kicking technique in Toudi.  Triangle Flying - This technique involves jumping or leaping to three points. That is, you use the footing from a wall, tree stump or the ground to deliver a kick, move to an advantageous position, or move to safe distance using three points. “

 

So we didn’t come up with something new, just re-invented the wheel so to speak. The texture that Itoman describes as Toudi is very rich in perhaps lost techniques such as this. Much more environmental focused than today’s dojo Karate, or so I conjecture.

 

Toudi-jutst no Kenkyo Itoman Seijn

Itoman Seijin (Morinobu’s) book Toudi-jutsu no Kenkyu

 

This incredible work has been made available to us through the efforts of Mario Mckenna who has translated it into English. To give an overview or Toudi-jutsu I wish to share the table of contents for the book.

Contents

Preface...................................................................................................................... 2

Flowing about into any one of the six places...................................................... 4

Fundamentals........................................................................................................... 5

What is the Military Way........................................................................................ 5

An Outline of the Development of Combative Technique and Equipment... 8

The History of Boxing.............................................................................................. 9

The Development of Toudi.................................................................................. 12

The Military Ethics of Toudi................................................................................. 16

Things to Bear in Mind when Learning Toudi................................................... 18

Use of the Mind, Will & Spirit in Military Arts.................................................. 20

Notes on the Policy of the Prohibition of Weapons........................................ 22

Grades in Toudi...................................................................................................... 23

How Toudi is Organized........................................................................................ 24

Offence and Defense........................................................................................... 26

Toudi Techniques.................................................................................................. 26

Offensive, Defensive & Protective Techniques............................................... 29

Toudi Kata............................................................................................................... 68

Position of Vital Points........................................................................................ 100

Strategy................................................................................................................. 106

Military Tactics..................................................................................................... 106

The Way of Opposites........................................................................................ 108

Techniques of Cheating and Deception.......................................................... 110

Controlling Space and Using External Objects............................................... 112

Conclusion............................................................................................................ 114

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

When Joe Swift was the Uke


Joe-san Swift is my earliest friend on the internet. Years ago he even visited Derry one day. I’ve had this article on Koju-Ryu from a Japanese magazine from about 2003.  The author was Mizuguchi Rakuya, editor in chief of the Karate-do Monthly magazine, and features Hayashi Shingo Sensei, the last known teacher of Kojo-ryu..

While I do not have a translation of the article. The photos clearly show Joe-san taking the beating. And there is a relationship to Isshinryu useage. Not that Isshinryu has any kinship to the rare Koju system.












This is shared with Joe Swift’s permission. Joe  was originally an Isshinryu black belt and over years studied Mushikan in Kanazawa ,besides his profession in Weather Casting he is currently the head instructor of the Tokyo Mushikan http://tokyo-mushinkan.com/WhoWeAre.html  and has trained with many instructors in Okinawa and Japan. He has made frequent appearances on Japanese television, and a participant in several Japanese magazine articles. He has friends around the world frequently sharing articles and translations, has been a frequent contributor to FightingArts.con and many other places. He has also translated works for many Japanese and Okinawan authors.  

 

A true Renissance Man through his interests.

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Brown Belt and Sho Dan Standards


The purpose to having standards for our dojo, is not to have perfect goals. Rather these are the standards we expect each student during Brown Belt training, and Sho Dan training to pass through on their journey forward. If there is a goal the standards should always be improving.

 

From 1989 we have

 

            Kata Sho - Group
            Kata Ananku  -  Mike Cassidy
            Kata Seisan  - Young Lee
            Yellow Belt Te Wazza – Mike and Young
            Kata Saifa - Mike Cassidy
            Kata Seiunchin – Young Lee
            Kata Nihanchi – Mike Cassidy
            Kata Wansu – Young Lee
            Blue Belt Keri Wazza – Mike and Young
            Kata Chinto – Mike and Young
            Kobudo Kata – Tokumine No Kon – Mike Cassidy
            Kobudo Kata – Brown Belt version of the Bando Hidden Stick

           

This film was made before they studied Kusanku, Sunsu or Sanchin. While our standards have changed from that time somewhat, this is an accurate picture of expected Brown Belt development.

And I have a video of the youth performing the first 6 of the Aiki wazza. Aikido study begins at brown belt.
 

 

From 1991 we shift into Sho Dan standards.

 
           One of the individual practices Running up the wall and kicking – Young Lee
            Kata Kusanku – Mike Cassidy
            Kata Nijushiho – Young Lee
            Kata SunNuSu (Sunsu) – Andrew Ware
            Kobudo Kata Urashie No Bo – Mike Cassidy
            Optional Black Belt kata study – Sutrisno family Gojushiho – Young Lee
            Optional Black Belt Chinese Form Study – form Pai Lum Kuen – Andrew Ware

 
 
 
Then there are the Black Belt Keri Wazza, some of which are:
 

 
 
 
This is not the full range of our studies, but contains many of them.
 
By referring to these past performances we can be reminded of where we want to go as we proceed in the future.
 
 

 

Bando Form - the Hidden Stick


Just one morning, it happened.

My instructor Tom Lewis was friends with the founder of Amercian Bando Dr. Gyi.

While I heard stories about their system and training, and met several of their seniors at Sensei’s summer parties over the years, I never had the chance to train in the system.

When I was a brown belt, my then instructor in Isshinryu, Charles Murray, learned the Bando Staff form , The Horseman’s form (or the Horseman’s Foot soldiers Form), from another of my seniors Reese Rigby.

Reese learned it at a Bando summer camp when it was taught, and later competed with it in the Bando Nationals and won.

After Charles returned to the USAF and I was alone in my training. On those occasions when went to Salisbury I would stop in Dover, and also train with Reeese. He would review my Isshinryu kata, and whatever else I was learning from my friends, and also help me understand the staff form better. Such as turning the hand over for side strikes to the hand would be behind the bo for a stronger strike.

On one of those visits he also taught me the beginning of the Bando short stick form, the Hidden Stick.

Of course I practiced.


Then from Sensei Lewis I received a form to attend the 1983 Bando Summer Camp, one weekend in Maryland at a Boy Scout Campground.

There were others in Isshinryu there, some from Dover I think, Anna Lockwood and some others from Salisbury, as well as others in Isshinryu. (Don Bohan’s Group). I was about san-dan at that time. At that time I was then teaching young through the Scranton Boy’s Club.

The Bando Camp was an experience. No one wore obi, all the same t-shirt. A wide variety of training was offered:

                Bando stick techniques (including impact training striking logs),
                Escrima stick training.                    

                 A demonstration of the effects of different bullet impacts,
                Choking techniques taught by Rick Nemira

                Bando kumite skills
                Breaking skills (where Rick wowed all showing slaps as a breaking technique)

                Don Bohan teaching Urashie No Bo.
                A Bando Woman instructor teaching a form        

                Saturday Night there was a Bando War Game of sorts
                Early morning runs.

                I am sure there was more , but this is all that comes to mind at this time.

During the Bando Kumite skills (such as leaping knee kicks) I asked a question of one of the Bando instructors.  He replied something then asked me what would I do. I admit I was far from impressive looking and as I wasn’t wearing any rank, I replied to his question by throwing a round kick over his head. He asked me how I could to that and I think I responded it wasn’t difficult with 15+ years training.

He remembered me and after the war game he and I talked for a long while, I explained the diversity of training that I was experiencing  and he explained many details of Bando training as he understood them

The next morning I was using the time after breakfast to practice those Bando forms I knew. I ran through the Horseman’s Form then started the piece I knew of the Hidden Stick. The gentleman from the previous night observed me and asked how I knew them. I explained. Then he said that his version of the Hidden Stick was different. As he was going to attend a Bando seniors training session with Dr.Gyi, something regarding Gukri Knife impact training against rocks, and cutting stones thrown at oneself or some such exercises) he was going to have several  Brown Belts from his school teach the form to me.

For the next two hours two gentleman from that school, worked to teach me that form and the meanings of the movements. It went piece by piece. When I took breaks, having had experience learning forms quickly, I used the time to share the Horseman’s Form with Anna Lockwood, as she had previously asked me to do so. The time went quickly. I tried very hard to remember that form.


Shortly after lunch camp broke up. I then left to drive back to Scranton back up 84. The entire time I kept going through the stick form. Then when I got home I went out back and practiced some more.

Then practice, practice, practice.

A number of month later, Once again I went on a trip to visit Sensei. This time I was asked to share with everyone there some of my studies.  With the class I shared the Goju Saifa, with Sensei I shared the Tjimande Tiger form I studied, and of course I spent some time with Anna on the Bando staff set.


On the way home I stopped to visit Reese Rigby in Dover. We compared our versions of the Bando stick form. After we had each done it, he felt my form was fine, but he wasn’t going to change his way of doing it. I recall I remarked I felt the same.


So more practice, practice, practice.


Around 1988 I began to share ½ of the Bando Stick form as a Brown Belt practice. I had decided that while I wanted brown belts to have some weapons training, I was going to reserve all Isshinryu Kobudo for Dan training. I felt the students had more than enough to work on, and that I wanted them to know more about the system so as Dans they could focus greater intensity on the Isshinryu forms. As to ½ of the Bando stick form, it was more that enough of a form in it’s own right.
video
 
An interesting thing occurred, each time we competed in a tournament where we had not been seen previously. When a competitor approached the judges you could see them speaking between themselves, as was the audience audibly remarking that did the competitor not have a weapon (as the stick in the beginning is up the sleeve. Then when they stepped back and pulled the stick from their sleeve, there would be an audible gasp from the audience. As I said this has happened several times.
From what I understood the stick was a back up weapon. If the primary weapon (such as a sword) was lost on the battlefield, the stick could be pulled from the sleeve and you could continue to fight.  Its primary relevance today still remains the same. It is a subtle weapon for defensive use on the street. It is not designed or trained for stick to stick combat as we use it.
The full form became a optional Dan study (though so far all have elected to do so). It provides a challenging study for the Dan.
video

I have no idea as to how much we vary from the Bando version(s) of the form, as I do not study with anyone in Bando. I am content with the study as we proceed. However recently Bob Maxwell (Bando) shared an older Bando Kukri form, and our stick is very close to the same movement. It is possible that the stick was a variation on this form, originally. Perhaps a preliminary study to the Kukri Knife, studied in the Bando system.