Sunday, September 28, 2014

Masters Level Heian ShoDan (Sutrisno)


Masters Level Heian ShoDan (Sutrisno)

 

This is an advanced training drill from Sutrisno family Heian Sho Dan.

 

Facing 12 o’clock

 

  1. Rei facing 12 o’clock
  2. Turn to 9 o’clock , stepping LFF into Left Front Stance with a left low block followed by a right low block.
  3. Step RFF into Right Front Stance with a right low block followed by a left low block.
  4. Turn 180 clockwise to 3 o’clock, pivoting on the left foot, into Right Front Stance with a Right low block
  5. Pull the right foot back alongside the left, turn 90 counter-clockwise to 12 o’clock and deliver a right side descending hammer fist strike towards 3 o’clock.
  6. Pivoting 90 degrees clockwise to 3 o’clock on the right foot, LFF into Left Front Stance with a left low block followed by a right low block.
  7. Turn 90 degrees counter-clockwise to 12 o’clock, pivoting on the right foot, stepping forward with the left foot then a left low block turning into left high block, turning into a left high knife hand block.
  8. RFF into Right Front Stance with a right high block, then right middle inside block, then a right low block, then a left high punch, then a right middle punch finishing with a left low punch.
  9. LFF into Left Front Stance with a left high block, then left middle inside block, then a left low block, then a right high punch, then a left middle punch finishing with a right low punch.
  10. RFF into Right Front Stance with a right high block, then right middle inside block, then a right low block, then a left high punch, then a right middle punch finishing with a left low punch.
  11. Turn 270 counter-clockwise, pivoting on the right foot, stepping into Left front stance to 3 o’clock with a left low block followed by a right low block..
  12. RFF into Right Front Stance with a right high punch then a left middle punch.
  13. Turn 180 clockwise to 9 o’clock, pivoting on the left foot, into Right Front Stance with a right low block followed by a left low block.
  14. LFF into Left Front Stance with a left high block then a right middle punch.
  15. Turn to 6 o’clock , stepping LFF into Left Front Stance with a left low block
  16. Step RFF into Right back stance with a right inside middle strike then a right outside middle hammerfist strike..
  17. Step LFF into Left back stance with a left inside middle strike then a left outside middle hammerfist strike.
  18. Step RFF into Right back stance with a right inside middle strike then a right outside middle hammerfist strike..
  19. Turn 270 counter-clockwise to 9 o’clock, pivoting on the right foot, stepping into Left back stance with a left open hand outer middle strike and an accompanying right open hand middle cover, then a right open middle hand outer middle strike and an accompanying left open hand middle cover.
  20. Pivoting on the left foot, RFF to 10:30, stepping into Right back stance, with a right open hand outer middle strike and an accompanying left open hand middle cover, then a left open hand outer middle strike and an accompanying right open hand middle cover..
  21. Pivot on the left foot, and turn to 3 o’clock, stepping into a Right back stance, with a right open hand outer middle strike and an accompanying left open hand middle cover, then a left open hand outer middle strike and an accompanying right open hand middle cover..
  22.  Pivoting on the right foot, LFF to 1:30, stepping into Left back stance with a left open hand outer middle strike and an accompanying right open hand middle cover.then a right open middle hand outer middle strike and an accompanying left open hand middle cover.
  23. Step back into a closing Rei.

 

 

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Meet Joe Swift

I much recommend you read these pieces by Joe Swift which were published in FightingArts.com. His research is invaluable to understand Okinawan karate better. He has been a close friend and collaborator since I joined the internet. I want you to share in what he has written. He is skilled in many  arts, has established a dojo in Tokyo and has translated books and other works from Japanese.


Search results for 'Joe Swift'
Review - Five Years One Kata: Putting Kata Back Into The Heart Of Karate
By Joe Swift

The old stories of karate training in Okinawa often revolve around a student spending a number of years, usually three, learning his first kata. Of course, modern teachers very seldom take this approach for fear that it will drive potential students away, but nonetheless, the stories persist.

Shimabuku, Taro
By Joe Swift

Biography of Taro Shimabuku Okinawan karate and Kobudo expert.
Kyushojutsu: Historical Development
By Joe Swift

A brief history and overview of the development of this ancient Okinawan art of striking vital points.
Throws in Karate?
By Joe Swift

Karate has a lot more techniques than most people think, including a variety of throws and takedowns.

 By Joe Swift

The series of five basic kata called Pinan (later renamed Heian in Japan) are probably the most widely practiced kata in karate today, but were they based on an earlier kata known as Channan?

Kyushojutsu: Basic Theory
By Joe Swift

The basic theory behind the ancient Okinawan art of striking vital points or Kyushojutsu.

Roots Of Shotokan: Funakoshi's Original 15 Kata - Part 1: Classification & Knowledge Of Kata
By Joe Swift

Funakoshi's classification and selection of kata determined that his karate represented both sides of the Okinawan karate tradition.

Unraveling The Mysteries Of The Nafadi Tradition: Its Kata
By Joe Swift

While we don't know the original Nafadi curriculum we can make some educated guesses based upon some evidence and data, as well as the kata of this tradition

Roots Of Shotokan: Funakoshi's Original 15 Kata - Part 3: Seisan, Wanshu, Chinto, Jitte & Jion Kata
By Joe Swift

While their origin is obscure these kata are among the most important to the system.

Martial Arts: Goju-ryu Karate Kata A Brief Over-view of the Etymology of Modern Goju-ryu Karate-do Kata
By Joe Swift and Mario McKenna

Okinawa karate is indebted to the Southern schools of Chinese boxing for much of its technical knowledge and expertise and the animals were associated with a specific physical/mental characteristic and training principles
.
Roots Of Shotokan: Funakoshi's Original 15 Kata - Part 2: Pinan, Naihanchi, Kushanku & Passai Kata
By Joe Swift

The surprising meaning and origin of Shotokan's Pinan, Naihanchi, Kushanku & Passai Kata kata.

In Honor of our Founder Shimabuku Tatsuo Sensei.


For all the children who have trained in Isshinryu, a photograph preserved and shared by Daniel  j. Vena. On the 106th birthday of Isshinryu founder Shimabuku Tatsuo, September 18, 2014.

 

This photo is one of many taken that visit, here In Honor of our Founder Shimabuku Tatsuo Sensei. you see him working with the DiTore children. The Isshando Karate Association was the name of Don Nagle's organization at that time.  Notice the patch, it is the Isshando Karate Association Patch 

Friday, September 19, 2014

Viatal Points and Medical Diagrams of the Upper Leg

Various older diagrams of which I no longer know the source, just in hard copy.