Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

1989 Summer Camp Drills


 Just discovered a video 0f our practicing after the 1989 Bushi No Te Summercamp to try and retain what we were shown.

 

 

Tristan Sutrisno taught the aikido drills

 
Featuring John O’Halloran, Michael Cassidy and Young Lee

 

This set also included Ernest Rothrols Mantis drills

         
Featuring John O’Halloran, Michael Cassidy and Young Lee

 

 

These 2 attacker Aikido drills were shown

 
        

Featuring Victor Smith, John O’Halloran, Michael Cassidy and Young Lee

 

 

Ernest Rothrock taught part pf this Northern  Shaolin White Crane form

 

 
              Featuring  Michael Cassidy and Young Lee
 

Taken from our notes, to enhance learning

Thursday, March 19, 2015

MoreTjimande basic drills


 

Tjimande (Cjimande) Drills with Tris Sutrisno from 1993.

Filmed at the Derry Boys and Girls Club.

 

Tjimande is an Indonesian martial art Sutrisno Senei studied from age 4 with his father and then his uncle. This clinic represents a glimpse at some basic tjimande training drills.

 

 

Stance Note:

 

These drills use what I would call a light cat stance. The knees released, you stand light in the cat stance. The spine straight and centered, and the stance has you lower your center of gravity. You work to remain poised, yet balanced and centered, this allows light movement throughout the technique.

 

Principle Note:

 

Tjimande isn’t using focused power at the end of a strike. Instead the use of circular motion is the key.  Blocks are parries to move the attacker, or to place them for the following applied technique.  Those parries also retain the potential to strike if requird.

 

The essential motion in tjimande is free flowing very quick movement. Balance is paramount to make these technique work correctly.

 

Parrying Hand/Palm Notes:

 

The parrying palm hand rotates from the palm facing the centerline to the palm turning into the limb being parried.

 

            The parrying bent wrist (similar to Isshinryu’s Seisan 2nd row hand technique)

flows from the hand rising on the centerline and then the arm rolling into the attacking limb and the back of the hand flowing across that limb.

 

Kicking Leg Note:

 

The kicking tool is the instep. The instep and/or the lower leg strike as a unit. The primary targets appear to be the groin or the inner thigh or outer side of the leg.

 

This kick seems to be a very quick set-up technique. Striking as a unit of shin and instep will strike into vulnerable striking areas of the leg, lower abdomen.


 

Distancing


 

Tris made a great point about advanced technique, that it is not the perfect form technique, but must adjust for the space involved between you and the attacker. 

 

He suggested getting into cat stance, with the front foot just before a wall. Then practice striking with both hands and not hitting the wall.

 

Likewise a cat stance (a little further back) can be used test the front kick.

 

It is essential to know where you are and how to modify your technique to strike appropriately in that situation.


 


Basic Drill 1 (Low Parries):

 

  1. Step left foot forward, into a left light cat stance, as the left open hand performs a low downward parry (circling clockwise)
  2. Step right foot forward, into a right light cat stance, as the right open hand performs a low downward parry (circling counter-clockwise)
  3. Step right foot backward, into a left light cat stance, as the left open hand performs a low downward parry (circling clockwise)
  4. Step right foot forward, into a right light cat stance, as the right open hand performs a low downward parry (circling counter-clockwise)

 

 

 

Basic Drill 2 (High Parries):

 

  1. Step left foot forward, into a left light cat stance, as the left open hand performs a high outside parry (circling counter-clockwise)
  2. Step right foot forward, into a right light cat stance, as the right open hand performs a high outside parry (circling clockwise)
  3. Step right foot backward, into a left light cat stance, as the left open hand performs a high outside parry (circling counter-clockwise)
  4. Step right foot forward, into a right light cat stance, as the right open hand performs a high outside parry (circling clockwise)

 

 

 

Basic Drill 3 (Middle Parries):

 

  1. Step left foot forward, into a left light cat stance, as the left open hand performs a middle outside parry (circling counter-clockwise)
  2. Step right foot forward, into a right light cat stance, as the right open hand performs a middle outside parry (circling clockwise)
  3. Step right foot backward, into a left light cat stance, as the left open hand performs a middle outside parry (circling counter-clockwise)
  4. Step right foot forward, into a right light cat stance, as the right open hand performs a middle outside parry (circling clockwise)


 

Basic Drill 4 (Instep kicking 1):

 

  1. From a left foot forward, left light cat stance, place the left heel down. The arms are hanging from the side for this drill.
  2. Right rising front instep kick (toes pointed down) and return the foot to its starting position.
  3. When the right foot has returned, the weight shifts back on that leg into left light cat stance, and the left foot delivers a left front instep kick (toes pointed down.) and then returns the foot to its starting position.
  4. From a left foot forward, left light cat stance, place the left heel down. The arms are hanging from the side for this drill.
  5. Right rising front instep kick (toes pointed down) and return the foot to its starting position.
  6. When the right foot has returned, the weight shifts back on that leg into left light cat stance, and the left foot delivers a left front instep kick (toes pointed down.) and then returns the foot to its starting position.

 

Basic Drill 5 (Instep kicking 2):

 

  1. From a left foot forward, left light cat stance, place the left heel down. The left open hand is raised in center chamber.
  2. Right rising front instep kick (toes pointed down), with an accompanying right middle outer open hand parry, and return the foot to its starting position.
  3. When the right foot has returned, the weight shifts back on that leg into left light cat stance, and the left foot delivers a left front instep kick (toes pointed down.) , with an accompanying left middle outer open hand parry, and then returns the foot to its starting position.
  4. From a left foot forward, left light cat stance, place the left heel down. The left open hand is raised in center chamber.
  5. Right rising front instep kick (toes pointed down), with an accompanying right middle outer open hand parry,  and return the foot to its starting position.
  6. When the right foot has returned, the weight shifts back on that leg into left light cat stance, and the left foot delivers a left front instep kick (toes pointed down.), with an accompanying left middle outer open hand parry, and then returns the foot to its starting position.

 


 

 

Tjimande Juru 1993.1


 

            Attacker:  RFF Right Front Punch

                             LFF Left Front Punch

 

            Juru:

1.      Left foot forward, left light cat stance, with a left middle open hand outer parry

2.      Right foot forward, right light cat stance, with a right middle open hand outer parry (against their right punch).

3.      Right foot backward, left zen stance, with the left low open hand parry (clockwise). The parrying hand would stop above the knee (in form practice)

4.      Left foot forward with a left middle open hand outer parry (against their left strike)

5.      Left foot backward, right zen stance, with a right low open hand parry (counter-clockwise). The parrying hand would stop above the knee (in form practice)

 

Juru applied:

1.      Left foot forward, left light cat stance, left high open hand outer parry (counter-clockwise)

2.      Right foot forward, right high open hand outer parry (clockwise). This parries their right arm to the right.

3.      Right foot backward, into left zen stance, the right hand hooking (not grabbing) over the attackers arm, the left open hand low parry (clockwise). The left hand is placed behind their elbow. This is the set up for drawing back and using that power, and elbow immobilization

4.      Shift your weight back on the right leg, left light cat stance, left open outer hand parry (counter-clockwise). This parries their left arm to the left.

5.      Left foot backward, right zen stance, the left hand hooking (not grabbing) over the attackers arm, the right open hand low parry (counter-clockwise). The left hand is placed behind their elbow. This is the set up for drawing back and using that power.

 

The movement is very light and flowing. The stepping parry is just to begin to re-direct and then pull them forward as you step back. That parry hand hooks over and under the opponents arm, and the left low parry is a break, controlling technique at the end.

 

This section has great power within it. Arm fracture is a real goal, though the technique can be very good to just drop them from pain avoidance.

 

This technique parallels Tai Chi Chaun’s Pull Back, has a similarity to Aikido’s Go-kyu lock, and can be a direct ringer for the pull back strike back in Isshinryu Chinto too.

 


Tjimande Juru 1993.2

 

Attacker:

    1. RFF, right zen stance, lunge punch to the head
    2. Left reverse punch to the head
    3. Right lunge punch to the lower abdomen
    4. Left reverse punch to the lower abdomen
    5. Left front kick and then place the left foot down in front
    6. Right Reverse Punch

 

Juru:

 

1.      Left foot forward, left light cat stance, left outer open bent wrist parry (palm up) (counter-clockwise)

2.      Right outer open bent wrist parry  (palm up) (clockwise)

3.      Left low open hand parry (clockwise)

4.      Right low open hand parry (counter-clockwise)

5.      Left foot back and double palm parry against the kick

6.      Circle both hands up in a clockwise middle parry against their right reverse punch. Keep both hands together as the last technique description.

7.      Left instep kick (delivered into the inner thigh/groin)

 

Juru applied:

 

  1. Left foot forward, left light cat stance, left outer open bent wrist parry (palm up) (counter-clockwise). This light technique moves their attack away from your center.
  2. Right outer open bent wrist parry  (palm up) (clockwise). This light technique moves their attack away from your center.
  3. Left low open hand parry (clockwise)
  4. Right low open hand parry (counter-clockwise)
  5. Left foot back and double palm parry against the kick
  6. Circle both hands up in a clockwise middle parry against their right reverse punch. Keep both hands together as the last technique description. The outer right forearm is the actual parrying motion.
  7. Left instep kick (delivered into the inner thigh/groin). Actually knee release (center re-alignment) should permit the groin or inner thigh, or the ever popular outer thigh as the recipient. Groin = pain, inner thigh = pain, outer thigh = charley house point to drop the attacker.

 

These parries must flow to lightly move an attacker away, yet contain real pain power if required.

 


Tjimande Juru 1993.3

 

Attacker:

  1. RFF, right zen stance, lunge punch to the body

 

Juru:

 

  1. Left foot forward, left light cat stance, with a left open hand inner parry
  2. Right foot forward, right light cat stance with a right rising outer middle open hand parry behind their elbow, [This is the opening for the eagle claw/tjimande lock], but only enough to bend their arm a little.
  3. Release knees, rotate center 45 degrees clockwise (to the right), and deliver a right front instep kick before their leg.
  4. Rotate to 3 o’clock and sweep the left heel back (forming right zen stance) to sweep their leg back. The left hand presses to 3 o’clock.

 

Juru applied:

 

  1. Left foot forward, left light cat stance, with a left open hand inner parry. This presses their arm down and slightly off the center-line.
  2. Right foot forward, right light cat stance with a right rising outer middle open hand parry behind their elbow, [This is the opening for the eagle claw/tjimande lock], but only enough to bend their arm a little. The trapped arm (between your left descending parry and this right ascending parry, is locked in this process.
  3. Release knees, rotate center 45 degrees clockwise (to the right), and deliver a right front instep kick before their leg. (set up for the following sweep)
  4. Rotate to 3 o’clock and sweep the left heel back (forming right zen stance) to sweep their leg back. The left hand presses to 3 o’clock. This is another lock. It can be used to immobilize them and especially if dropped to the floor. The left hand pressing forward really represents the attackers forearm being rotated, causing greater pressure as the final press is made.

 


Tjimande Juru 1993.4

 

Attacker:

  1. RFF, right zen stance, lunge punch to the body

 

Juru:

 

  1. Start with a Left foot forward, left light cat stance, with a left open hand inner parry
  2. Right outer hand parry (clockwise)
  3. Rotate right hand counter-clockwise (palm up) pivoting on the elbow.
  4. Left foot back to form a right zen stance, the right open hand low palm strike (counter-clockwise)

 

Juru applied:

 

  1. Start with a Left foot forward, left light cat stance, with a left open hand inner parry
  2. Right outer hand parry (clockwise) moves the attackers punching arm to the right.
  3. Rotate right hand counter-clockwise (palm up) pivoting on the elbow. Here you flow their arm counter-clockwise, bending their elbow. The flat spin back bends their arm and at the end your right arm grabs their wrist on top (your thumb facing down). As you do this you cross their arm with their forearm.
  4. Left foot back to form a right zen stance, the right open hand low palm strike (counter-clockwise). When you step back, your right arm/hand flows into a down parry (counter-clockwise) this rotates them over and down on their back.

 

This is a high skill technique. Key is sitting in the light cat stance and being able to rotate your arm freely.

 

Optional: When your left steps away you can step to the back right, rotating the attackers arm in a new direction as you press them down. 

 

Other consideration:  You can use your left arm to stabilize your elbow as your opening right arm parries them. That elbow stabilization can make it easier to bend their forearm across their arm’s centerline, setting up the descending press takedown.

 

 


 

Tjimande Juru 1993.5

 

Attacker:

  1. RFF, right zen stance, lunge punch to the body

 

Juru:

 

  1. Step Left foot forward, left light cat stance, with a left open hand inner parry
  2. Keeping your left hand on their arm, grab and rotate that arm counter-clockwise around its axis, then Step forward with your right foot.
  3. Pivot 180 degrees counter-clockwise (left foot forward facing 6 o’clock).
  4. As you pivot the right arm reaches up (on the outside of their arm) and grab their arm below the wrist from the outside.
  5. With both hand so on their wrist, sharply press both hand down.
  6. Rotate on your right foot so your left foot can kick back into their groin.

 

Juru applied:

 

  1. Step Left foot forward, left light cat stance, with a left open hand inner parry
  2. Keeping your left hand on their arm, grab and rotate that arm counter-clockwise around its axis, then Step forward with your right foot.
  3. Pivot 180 degrees counter-clockwise (left foot forward facing 6 o’clock).
  4. As you pivot the right arm reaches up (on the outside of their arm) and grab their arm below the wrist from the outside.
  5. With both hand so on their wrist, sharply press both hand down. At this point you’ve parried, stepped in and turned to take advantage  of the arm bar/break potential.
  6. Rotate on your right foot so your left foot can kick back into their groin. This completes the movement, extending their arm and then destroying their groin.

 

Execution:

 

This technique series must be performed with a very fluid motion.

Use extreme caution in practice.

 


Tjimande Juru 1993.6

 

 

Attacker:

  1. RFF, right zen stance, lunge punch to the body
  2. Followed with a left punch
  3. Optional other multiple punches.

 

 

Juru:

 

  1. Against the right punch, from a LFF Left light cat stance, use a Right Outer parry (clockwise) beginning to roll the attackers arm down.
  2. Then the left outer Parry (counter-clockwise) moves their arm away from your centerline.
  3. The attacker throws their left punch, you use a right inner parry (counter-clockwise) beginning to roll the attackers arm down.
  4. Then the left outer parry (counter-clockwise) moves their arm away from your centerline.

 

 

 

This technique is not a set sequence, but rather using continuing circular parries to remove an attacker, creating an opening.  Tris would demonstrate various circular versions. In his work the key wasn’t the exact sequence, rather the use of the principle to remove the attack.


Aikido Drills

 

Tris worked several defenses against an attackers RFF Right Hand grabbing your left hand.

 

Aikido Sequence 1

 

  1. Press your right hand down across their grabbing hand (locking it to your left wrist)
  2. Step forward with your left foot, maintaining the press on their hand, and roll your right elbow over across the top of their arm. This becomes a bent wrist lock takedown.

 

Aikido Sequence 2

 

  1. Roll your left hand up (rotating a the elbow), rolling their grabbing arm over.
  2. When your left palm is facing up, grab their hand at the pad of the palm near the little finger, with your right hand (palm out).
  3. Rotate your left hand counter-clockwise and maintain the right hand lock.
  4. This becomes an outer wrist turn takedown.


 

Aikido basic # 9, Tjimande Variation

 

Attacker RFF Right Punch

 

  1. Right foot forward, right light cat stance, right outer circular parry with the left hand touching the right hand. [Alignment theory, this keeps the defender’s left side active in the technique, and prepares them for quicker response to the follow up.]
  2. Right foot step forward and separate the two arms in opposite directions
  3. Aikido #9 uses the right hand to hook their arm as the left pressing hand across the eyes, rotates their neck to roll them across your body in a painful lock.
  4. Tjimande variant 1 as the left foot steps up it locks behind their right foot. The hand separation then becomes a takedown to the left (on their back).
  5. Tjimande variant 2 as the left foot steps up it steps before the attackers right foot and then cuts back as the hand separation takes place. This becomes a takedown to the right (on their face)

 

The light movement skill of the Tjimande technique is very similar to aikido’s movement, IMVHO.

 

Tjimande Variation off of Basic #1 ( related to our basic walk though self defense)

 

Attacker RFF Right Punch

 

  1. Left foot forward into left light cat stance, with a left outer circular parry (supported by the right hand)
  2. Right foot steps forward, turning 90 degrees to the left, and hand separation takes place.
  3. Essentially the left hand grabs their wrist, the right hand presses into their shoulder and the right hand steps behind their right foot to hook it with the heel.
  4. Press in with the right hand and turn counter-clockwise for a spinning takedown to their back.

 

This is very much the reverse of the Aikido #9 above.

 

Alternate when your right steps in, you can grab the attackers wrist with your left hand and then cut in and down across their inner forearm with a right knife hand. This pressure across the forearm with your turning breaks their balance for a spin down. Tjimande basic 3 works off of this principle.


Countering Aikido Locks and Takedowns

 

Countering the Arm Bar


 

  1. Attacker RFF Right Punch
  2. Defender RFF Double right outer parry
  3. Step forward with the left, turn to the right and the Defender Right hand grabs the wrist and brings their left elbow over the attackers arm. The right hand then rotates their arm clockwise, as the left elbow descends forming the arm bar.
  4. Attacker, as they rotate and press down, step forward with your left foot, and use that motion to roll your arm down and over (pulling back).
  5. As that happens your left hand grabs their right wrist.
  6. Then roll them over clockwise, in an up and down motion, reversing the same lock on them as you do so.

 

The basic principle here is that all locks and counters are most vulnerable ½ the way through their execution. This is the point where an aware opponent can counter the technique.

 

 

Countering the walk through takedown when you’re on the floor.

 

  1. Attacker RFF, Right Punch
  2. Defender LFF Left double outer parry, then the right steps up, between their left and the attackers right foot, placing their right behind the attackers left.
  3. The hands separate and the press into the shoulder with the left check is a takedown.
  4. When the Attacker is no the floor, they go with takedown, roll back and then reverse it to roll up standing to their feet.
  5. When on their feet, the bounce their right foot behind the defenders right foot and reverse the takedown.

 

This teaches the mistake of not following the individual down to the floor. Instead they’re left to come back and counter.

 


Countering Tjimande Juru 1993.5

 

Attacker:

  1. RFF, right zen stance, lunge punch to the body

 

Juru:

 

  1. Step Left foot forward, left light cat stance, with a left open hand inner parry
  2. Keeping your left hand on their arm, grab and rotate that arm counter-clockwise around its axis, then Step forward with your right foot.
  3. Pivot 180 degrees counter-clockwise (left foot forward facing 6 o’clock).
  4. As you pivot the right arm reaches up (on the outside of their arm) and grab their arm below the wrist from the outside.
  5. With both hand so on their wrist, sharply press both hand down.
  6. Rotate on your right foot so your left foot can kick back into their groin.

 

Counter:

 

     When they reach step 5, the normal reaction is to rise on your toes trying to keep away from the pain. Instead Tris steps around their legs with his right changing the angle of their lock. Then he bends his arm up (bending the elbow) and then rotates his feet and body counter-clockwise, this motion, plus his left hand grabbing their arm, reverses the lock and places them down on their back.

 

Interesting, Harrill Sensei had a different counter. He showed how to press into the back making the lock impossible to work.


Countering Tjimande Juru 1993. 3

 

Attacker:

  1. RFF, right zen stance, lunge punch to the body

 

Juru:

 

  1. Left foot forward, left light cat stance, with a left open hand inner parry
  2. Right foot forward, right light cat stance with a right rising outer middle open hand parry behind their elbow, [This is the opening for the eagle claw/tjimande lock], but only enough to bend their arm a little.
  3. Release knees, rotate center 45 degrees clockwise (to the right), and deliver a right front instep kick before their leg.
  4. Rotate to 3 o’clock and sweep the left heel back (forming right zen stance) to sweep their leg back. The left hand presses to 3 o’clock.

 

To counter this, when they begin to rotate and sweep their left leg back, Tris simply steps back with his right leg into Left Zen stance. This draws them forward (off balance) as they try to compensate for the lock they no longer have.. Then he steps up placing his left alongside his right leg, as they’re moving forward, and rotates his body clockwise 180 degrees. The lock they’re trying to maintain works against them and he reverses them with a armbar takedown.

 

Tjimande basic drills


                The key is turning the torso to drive the strikes, not the arms.

                The stepping and moving should remain light, allowing the use of the turn to generate the force involved.

 

Opening Attack – RFF Right Lunge Strike (Grab)

 

  1. RFF double rising front to rear (counter-clockwise) double palm strike.
    1. Simultaneous strike to face and then arm
    2. The right foot can step across the attackers foot and this can become a variation of Aikido’s heaven and earth throw.

 

  1. LFF double rising front to rear (clockwise) double palm strike.
    1. Simultaneous strike to arm
    2. Simultaneous strike to head and arm

 

  1.  LFF double rising front to rear (clockwise) double palm strike, then RFF double rising front to rear (counter-clockwise) double palm strike.
    1. Parry arm aside, if arm goes under their arm, then 2nd strike step through into their ribs.
    2. Parry arm down, if arm remains on top, then 2nd strike step through to the head.
    3. Variation on where you step when you strike on the 2nd one.

                                                              i.      To the side 90 degree takedown

                                                            ii.      Straight in, a KO strike to the head, straight back takedown

                                                          iii.      If your initial step rolls into the right, and then steps through with the 2nd stroke, it becomes a variation of the Aikido irmi nage (entering throw)

 

General Note:  Techniques 1, 2, and 3 describe use of Chinto Kata technique.

 

  1.  RFF double rising front to rear (counter-clockwise) double palm strike. The left hand grabs their right wrist (from the inside) as you turn 90 degrees and the right elbow strikes straight back into their ribs.
    1. Then pull their arm down for an over the shoulder for a very painful arm lock.
    2. Then pull their arm down for an over the shoulder throw takedown.
    3. Or step behind 180 degrees with the left foot then turn 180 degrees counter-clockwise and pull their arm down across your shoulder for an over the shoulder throw takedown.
    4. Either a. or b. can be enhanced by dropping to your knees during the throw.

 

  1.  RFF double rising front to rear (counter-clockwise) double palm strike. The left hand grabs the attackers wrist as the right forearm lays across their forearm. The left foot steps off to the right side as you rotate counter-clockwise pulling the left arm down and just laying your right forearm across their forearm. [This makes their balance point shift to their forearm and their center does not support it. You then focus their balance to your control.] This is a rolling layered takedown, a spin down.

 

  1. RFF double rising front to rear (counter-clockwise) double palm strike. The left hand grabs the attackers wrist as the right knifehand lays across their wrist. The left foot steps off to the right side as you rotate counter-clockwise pulling the left arm down and just laying your right knifehand across their wrist. [This makes their balance point shift to their forearm and their center does not support it. You then focus their balance to your control.] This is a rolling layered takedown, a spin down.  Very similar to the last one, it creates a different throw/takedown as their center of balance shifts further from their true center, to their wrist.

 

Movements 5 and 6 can be found in Chinto Kata too.

 

  1. As they punch, LFF turning 90 degrees clockwise. Your right arm crosses their arm, grabbing their wrist, your left open hand flows into their face causing their head to turn away. You immediately lock them across your body, their arm one way their face/head/neck the other.  This is a little more fluid version of Aikido Drill 9. It is done as one movement, not in steps.

 

  1. LFB, you rotate 90 degrees to your left (counter-clockwise) as you step away, your right hand flowing over their arm and pressing down and away. Then you step LFF, 180 degrees to the right (clockwise), your left hand flowing over their arm and pressing down against their chest. This movement away and then reversal in form very fluid levered takedown.

 

  1. LFF (deep outside their strike) as your right hand parries their strike aside (and strikes into their face), then follow with a right rising crescent kick. You don’t kick them, rather your leg passes over their head/neck and when the crescent kick descends down on the other side of their neck, the inward descending pressure of you’re leg rolls them down and in.

 

Attacker LFF Left Strike

 

  1. RFF turning 90 degrees to the left as you step forward, both arm outstretched from your sides. Then your left foot steps behind 180 degrees to your rear. You rotate counter-clockwise as you continue to step behind. The arms remain outstretched, but you’re turning torso cause a windmill effect, rolling your attacker down.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Double Supple Dragon - an advanced brown belt practice



One of the facets of the Bushi No Te Isshinryu program is that we have additional form requirements honoring friends I have trained with, and additionally adding another dimension to our practice.

 

Long ago I first studied with Ernest Rothrock Laoshi, and often observer his students studying a Pai Lum form Supple Dragon. I requested Ernest to share it with my students to allow them to touch his training. That did not make our students kung fu stylists, but it did expose them to another form of training.

 

No question Isshinryu snuck in there as time passed. We are not Pai Lum students after all. However it add a dimension to our potential. Also, it gives my students a reason to hate me forever. A challenge.

 

In this video Andrew Ware and Luke Hodgkins are performing the form in different directions. This is more difficult. This was taken on 12-2-1995.

Some Seisan Kata Application Potential



On December 2, 1995 Ernest Rothrock Laoshi visited my school to give a clinic in a 2 person form he teaches from the Ching Woo association. We also spent time sharing other material. A few of his other arts to allow my students to see them. And some examples of what we were also working on.

 

I gave him a demonstration of the application potential I saw for Isshinryu Seisan Kata.

 

This is not how we study application potential, That is quite different.Moving from understanding potential applications, which use a basic attack.

 

And that is misleading for the punch is also a defense against a grab, just a faster target for training.

 

The study moves through many types of attacks. A layered long term study till application realization happens. But everyone must start somewhere.

 

So this was a demonstration of some of the range of Seisan kata.

 

This isn’t very clear, but I believe this shows what I see, I am abusing Jed Kurkowski and Young Lee is showing the form.