Thursday, December 31, 2015

Happy New Year 2016

 
 
 
Nothing does change, we recognize it is the last day of the year, and the first day of the next. A point in time. We remain.
 
I haven celebrated the New Year for many years, the last I can recollect was when the kids were young and then with Weird Al’s special. The kids liked him, So did I.
 
But it has been a tradition for me to document where I am as of this day.
 
I am yet disabled, almost the same as last year. I have my eating under control, along with my walking, and tests do show my Diabetes II is gone, so no more medication for that,  That is positive. But the rest the lack of balance. the facial muscle control affecting my speech remains, the overall weakness. etc. are there too.
 
Earlier in the year I started falling, I had a subdural hoemotomia on my brain. So brain surgery, draining the blood and almost instantly I was better. Then rehab and before long I was back to where I was before it occurred. No complaints.
 
 
The karate program continues. Mike Cassidy along with the assistance of Young Lee are doing a great job with the kids program. Devin Van Curren has been a big help to me, and I continue to assist as I can.
After 20 years, Devin Van Curren finished her training to Sho Dan, and now the more complex training begins. She began when she was 8 took off for High School and University, Worked summers leaving little time to train, but she kept at it and had a very credible test.
 
The adult program has been quite interesting. Ending the year reviewing our Aikido drills. Then the mixture of kata, kobudo and application studies continued.
 
I have been placing a lot of information on this blog. Trying to share as much with my students as possible. Much of it is not in our classes, but comes from my own martial studies. This allows them to share in the material if there is a future interest.
 
A personal observation, there is far less quality discussion about the arts than in the past. Where groups like YahooGroups did spawn discussion. People seem less likely to discuss what they do. Yes places like Facebook and YouTube, allow sharing of material unlike anything in the past. I believe it makes things more difficult in the future to be able to learn how to discern what is being shown. YouTube as interesting as it can be, does not confir the ability to see everything. Even the strongest performance does not show the thousands of steps to get there, no suggest what steps come next. IMO Progress and potential are open-ended.
 
I continue to read, and watch too many movies. I am not sure the current blockbusters with greater and greater evils make for good movies.
 
I continue my hobby of writing in the Destroyer Universe. I have written reviews of maybe 45 of the books (at this time there are 151 and more coming) I have also written a few short stories. Breaking new ground by incorporating photos in the later part of the year. As yet, no new books planned, but who knows.
 
I do not walk every day, weather interferes. But as often as I can, 4 or 5 times a week, When I walk it is for 1 – 3 miles. I maintain regular photos of my walks. I am convinced this is what helped me most with my diabetes.
 
I also practice some of my Yang Tai Chi daily. I am lessened in what I can do. But I am also learning more about the Tai Chi, in the regular practice.  Along side I continue my kata practice, at least 1 – 3 kata a day. Often Sanchin, Seisan, Nihanchi or Wansu. Less frequently Chinto and Kusanku which are much more difficult. Separate is SunSu which is also a frequent practice. I am much slower and also weaker.\
 
Of my other kata traditions. Ueichi Sanchin, Tomari Rohai, Saifa, Tensho and Nijushiho, are studied.
I am continually trying to see new applications. That is the opening step for sure.  But one does what one can.
 
That is the high points. Not terribly different from last year, I am hopeful we will find more success in 2016.
 
 
 
 

 

 

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

More On Jion Kata


I just discovered an old article on kata Jion, that is very good.

 I have discussed Jion in the past.



I believe they help to accompany the article.






 
 
Unfortunately, I do not know where this came from, as I had it in hard copy. The links listed no longer exist.

Saturday, December 26, 2015

RH Gutierrez , Md between Medical knowledge and karate




RH Gutierrez , Md

For 17 years our program was most fortunate to have Paul Harper Md FACS training with us. As a Surgeon he made many contributions to our studies together. But in time he had to follow his own path.
 
His many contributions are still with us.
 
I recently discovered yet another Doctor who is sharing his medical knowledge helping us understand more about karate and modern medical knowledge.
 
I offer the following vides RH Gutierrez has made, as worthy studies. We all might gain more from watching them.
 




Strike to the head jerking the neck  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrD4HLZzG5U

The spine and abnormal curvature   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xc11CGx2CCk



Anatomy of the Skull and the fist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byWWemtlWXE

Friday, December 25, 2015

A Few of My Favorite Things



Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens
Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens
Brown paper packages tied up with strings
These are a few of my favorite things

 

The holiday is a time to reflect on some things I really like.

The unexpected, the unusual, the offbeat way of looking at familiar things.

 
As always the spiritual makes its entry. That karate (or anything) works because you have faith in what you do.  It matters now what they do, rather what you know you will make work.

 
That said, here are several possibilities from our basic training.

 
!. Step forward with the right foot, rotating to the left as you circle both hands up in a counter-clockwise motion. Which is equally valid if you step forward with the left foot, rotating to the right as you circle both hands up in a clockwise motion.

 The basic motion is found in Chinto kata, but the potential is one not ofter considered, the inside of the stepping strike, not the extended strike on the end. I first learned this drill as a basic drill in another system, but after decades of practice, came to realize it was also in Chinto kata. It is also a portion of the Tai Chi Da Lu drill.

 

There are many possible uses to this motion. I will only mention several.

 

A.   An interior line of defense - Against a right punch. You step forward and the hands sweep up in union, counter-clockwise. The sweeping left hand deflects the strike up and away from your center.

 

The sweeping right hand, strikes into the face or neck, and then        continues to press into their biceps of the striking arm.

After the left arm deflects their strike their arm, as it continues on its arc, it rolls that hand over to press into their arm and draw it forward. Their right hand is pressed into their biceps, it also turned over into a palm up position, That pressing motion rotates them forward, and as their center of gravity shifted over to their biceps, they are off balanced, and with further stepping shift behind their right leg, becomes a takedown.

 

B.   An exterior line of defense - Should the attacker strike forward with their left punch, step forward with your right foot. In unison both hands arc up in a clock-wise motion.

 The left hand deflects their arm up, then down as it snakes over and rotates the palm pressing into their arm. The right forearm which has been rotated also palm up parallelling the left arm, presses into their left arm triceps. The two arms in unison use the left torso rotation to bend the attacker forward. As their center of gravith has shifted to their biceps, this caused them to move forward and down. A takedown or a projection.

 

This is using a plane of force, generated by the stepping, turning, sweeping motion of the arms, as the weapon.  When truly unexpected it has great effect.

 2.This motion came to me from training with Sherman Harrill, When I tried it for the first time on Young Lee, who had no idea of its existence, he was dropped to the floor. Worked the first time, and every time since.

 
This is of course the opening of Seisan kata. And you know what I think about that movement. LFF Left Side Block, Right Punch.

 
A.  Exterior line of defense – If they are stepping forward with their right foot with a right strike. You step outside the strike with your left foot, as you move forward you begin the left side block. It becomes a wedging motion moving their strike toward the right.

When you conclude your stepping motion your right vertical punch strikes into the side of their thigh. Causing a charly horse, making them fall

 
B.   Exterior line of defense – If they are stepping forward with their left foot and a left strike. You step forward with a left block, deflecting their strike towards the left. Then you strike with your right vertical punch into the side of their thigh. . Causing a charly horse, making them fall

 
Note you are striking into their thigh with the ridge of your knuckles of your vertical punch, literally a sort of brass knuckle. On impact similar to a single knuckle strike, but less likely to fail and collapse the fist.

 
3.My final selection for today comes from Wansu kata. Where you step forward with your right foot and throw a right horizontal elbow strike forward, then turn 180 degrees to the left and chamber your hands to the right, as you assume a right cat stance.

      A.  Exterior line of Defense - Against a right stepping right strike. You         step forward with your left, and throw a right inward horizontal elbow
       strike. Use the interior surface of the strike, against their neck, head.     
       Your arm. Elbow, goes behind and around their neck.

You then turn to the left and shift into the cat stance, both your hands moving to the stack chamber on your right side. As their neck is surrounded by your arm, they shift at your motion. They are immobolized by this, or possibly their neck is wrenched in the process.

 
I have many favorite things, there are a few of them.

 

 

 

Monday, December 21, 2015

Chin-Na and Dr. Yang Jwing-Ming

 

 





Chin-Na is a component of many Chinese systems. Some having more, some having less. Systems like Northern Eagle Claw, Northern Mantis, White Crane, BaGua, to name a few all have Chin-Na components.

 A major influence as spreading information on Chim-Na is Dr, Yang Jwing Ming. With a background in several Chinese systems, and also with the logical mind that goes with a PhD in Engineering, by the 1980s he saw the relevance on sharing that for other martial artists through clinics, programs, books and video tapes.

 Being most logical his books detailed many of the components of Chin-Na training. They accompany the many fine video’s he created.

 
He broke the study down by the joints being affected, Hence grouping them by Finger, Wrist, Arm, Elbow and so forth.

 I had attended a clinic and workshop he gave on various arts. But Maureen Smith, my wife, took a 9 month course he offered on Chin-Na back in 1989. I was her practice partner, It was a painful time.

 A great many of his videos may be found on YouTube, This is an example:




The following are among his many books, these are on the variety of Chin- Na training.




 
 There are other publicans and videos on Chin-na, many of them are also worthy.
 While not exactly a practice of original karate, it does offer logical movements that can combine with karate.

Friday, December 18, 2015

Master Anko Itosu and His Ten Precepts of Karate




Master Anko Itosu and His Ten Precepts of Karate


 

 

Itosu Anko was responsible for taking the martial art from being a secretive, behind closed doors art, to being practiced by the general public in Okinawa.

 

In October 1908, master Anko Itosu wrote a letter to the Japanes Ministries of Education and War, where he expained in detail, the importance of karatedo practice. The letter was titled, “Ten Precepts (Tode Jukun) of Karate,” .

 

Ten Precepts of Karate

 

 

Karate did not develop from Buddhism or Confucianism. In the past the Shorin-ryu school and the Shorei-ryu school were brought to Okinawa from China. Both of these schools have strong points, which I will now mention before there are too many changes:

 

 

1.    Karate is not merely practiced for your own benefit; it can be used to protect one’s family or master. It is not intended to be used against a single assailant but instead as a way of avoiding a fight should one be confronted by a villain or ruffian.

 

2.    The purpose of karate is to make the muscles and bones hard as rock and to use the hands and legs as spears. If children were to begin training in Tang Te while in elementary school, then they will be well suited for military service. Remember the words attributed to the Duke of Wellington after he defeated Napoleon: “The Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton.”

 

 

3.    Karate cannot be quickly learned. Like a slow moving bull, it eventually travels a thousand miles. If one trains diligently every day, then in three or four years one will come to understand karate. Those who train in this fashion will discover karate.

 

4.    In karate, training of the hands and feet are important, so one must be thoroughly trained on the makiwara. In order to do this, drop your shoulders, open your lungs, take hold of your strength, grip the floor with your feet, and sink your energy into your lower abdomen. Practice using each arm one to two hundred times each day.

 

5.    When one practices the stances of Tang Te, be sure to keep your back straight, lower your shoulders, put strength in your legs, stand firmly, and drop your energy into your lower abdomen.

 

6.    Practice each of the techniques of karate repeatedly, the use of which is passed by word of mouth. Learn the explanations well, and decide when and in what manner to apply them when needed. Enter, counter, release is the rule of releasing hand (torite).

 

7.    You must decide if karate is for your health or to aid your duty.

 

8.    When you train, do so as if on the battlefield. Your eyes should glare, shoulders drop, and body harden. You should always train with intensity and spirit, and in this way you will naturally be ready.

 

9.    One must not overtrain; this will cause you to lose the energy in your lower abdomen and will be harmful to your body. Your face and eyes will turn red. Train wisely.

 

10.                       In the past, masters of karate have enjoyed long lives. Karate aids in developing the bones and muscles. It helps the digestion as well as the circulation. If karate should be introduced beginning in the elementary schools, then we will produce many men each capable of defeating ten assailants. I further believe this can be done by having all students at the Okinawa Teachers’ College practice karate. In this way, after graduation, they can teach at the elementary schools at which they have been taught. I believe this will be a great benefit to our nation and our military. It is my hope you will seriously consider my suggestion.

 
 

Anko Itosu, October 1908

 
 

 

 

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Thoughts on Kata Applications in Pre World War Karate Books part III





An instructor




What makes a good instructor?

 

It is a question of vision.

 

The way is not to see the student where they are today, but to see where they will be in 10 years and prepare them for that time.

 
 


As instructors you can share a great deal with the student. But you cannot make the choice to have them stay with the training. That is theirs alone. But you must approach each student every time as if they will be training 10 years hence and make sure they are preparing properly for that day.

 

That is why we first require a potential instructor to have been training at least 15 continuous years to be mature in their understanding of our art. Then an apprenticeship for 5 years to learn how to understand each students needs. To have the same base knowledge as our other instructors and gain skill at making choices how to express themselves using it in their instruction.

 

As time passes each instructor makes their mark on the art, but within the same body of material, at the same time.

 

Success is seen when you have students choosing to study and work for 30 or more years.

Thoughts on Kata Applications in Pre World War Karate Books part II







Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Thoughts on Kata Applications in Pre World War Karate Books part i

I discovered more hard copy from the old S.R.I.J. site. This is very good.







 
This was saved quite some time ago, the site is no longer active, nor have I found reference to it in any searches.

Monday, December 14, 2015

Black Belt Training 10-26-2002


 
Looking at past notes helps us remember where we have been. In this case the notes contains descriptions of the aikido drills I learned from Tristan Sutrisno, back in 1980 and then modifications he had made subsequently to the drill for his students around 1990. Of course since that time there have been several later modifications made by me, each to promote better student learning. The techniques are not completely Aikido in nature, but a blend of Aiki and karate. Entering and controlling the attack is the most important skill for the student.
 

The older version of the youth drills, which began at green belt and continued through black belt preparation.


Black Belt Classes 10/19,26/2002

 

Aging in one’s art is a reality. As my adult group are in our late 40’s through 60’s addressing our maturing needs to maintain quality training, but at the same time not destroy ourselves at the same time, is a logical goal.

 

Our arts offer a somewhat wider range than ‘pure’ Isshinryu, but one thing which is weathering quite well is our Isshinryu.  Most specifically continuing to concentrate on Mr. Lewis’ variation on the lower body chart, Isshinryu kicking continues to become more valuable, directed to lower body targets.

 

But what I’ve been concentrating on have been the basic Aikido training from Tris Sutrisno which we incorporate into our Brown Belt studies.

 

Our research makes us believe these Aikido practices originally arose out of Tanto (knife) self defense. As good aikido does, the attacker removes themselves out of a desire to get away from the pain (real or perceived) from the technique execution.

 

These variations are rather high tech, incorporating very rapid takedowns (which for the aging of us, become problematic, when we on longer choose to readily drop to our knees during the control/lockdown phase of the techniques.  Great aikido execution, good techniques especially for the younger MA.

 

My inclusion of these Aikido techniques fits several directions in by brown belt program.

 

First in that I don’t formally get into application of Isshinryu kata until after black belt. The aikido program allows my student to develop ‘basic’ manipulation skills. 

Second, these skills teach very exacting body shifting, which adds another layer into a student’s movement abilities.

Third, each technique is a great skill in their own right.  The student learning to enter an attack and flow through the attacker, with the minimal amount of force creates greater awareness of technique possibilities. This makes it easier to understand some of the later lessons from Isshirnyu application study.

 

But now I’m re-working them to keep them relevant for our group, and our capabilities.

The funny thing is, the more I do this, the greater the relevance to my Isshinryu I find.

 

The major change I’ve worked with was the manner in which the original techniques were ridden down into the ground, and have learned to map them to our Isshinryu kata.

 

That last statement is one important lesson. When I’ve been shown something it seems to lock into my brain, and takes great effort (often decades) to break out that other things are present.

 

Following are the original Aikido techniques and the ‘modifications’


All of the Uke (attackers) are stepping in with the right hand and  throwing a right punch (1).

 

Aikido 1 – original

 

Pivot 90 degrees to the left (on both feet) allowing the punch to slide past you. Your right hand flows on top of their arm/wrist.

Take your left hand and reach up underneath the attackers wrist.

Using both hands, circle your arms up (clockwise) and roll the attacker over your body to end up in a bent wrist lock (Aikido’s NiKyu).

Right front kick their face (or safer their abdomen).

Pivot 90 degrees to the left (on the ball of the left foot) and throw a right front kick past their leg, and snap it back (behind their lead leg) to drop to the floor on your right knee. This cuts their leg out and they go down on their back.

Holding their elbow on the floor, crank their wrist clockwise till they give up.

 

Aikido 1 – new modification

 

Pivot 90 degrees to the left (on both feet) allowing the punch to slide past you. Your right hand flows on top of their arm/wrist.

Take your left hand and reach up underneath the attackers wrist.

Using both hands, circle your arms up (clockwise) and roll the attacker over your body to end up in a bent wrist lock (Aikido’s NiKyu).

Option 1, holding their bent wrist with both hands, press their straight arm right into their shoulder (socket). This will immobilize them and lock their face down into the floor.

Option 2, holding their bent wrist with both hands, step in with your left foot (towards their shoulder) and throw a left low block (forearm press) behind their elbow, immobilizing them among other options.

 

This modification has the advantage that you control them without the higher technology of the kick and drop lock.

 

The manner in which the arm is cleared across your body, speaks for a knife being in the hand. There are alternative versions which can enter NiKyu but don’t use the kicking takedown, either.

 

Aikido 1 maps to SunUuSu Kata.  It also uses the double ball of the foot shifting as found in Annaku Kata.

 

Aikido 2 – Original

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

The right foot slides up alongside the left, as you rotate 90 degrees to the right, your right hand slides down their arm and grasps their wrist, as your left vertical knife hand is pressed against the back of their arm/shoulder, at the crease.

Your right hand pulls them very slightly forward.

Throw a left front kick past their lead leg, and then use the snap back to quickly shift their leg back, and drop to your left knee, with an arm bar (pressing into the ground) takedown.

Essentially they punch and you put their face on the ground.

 

[Note: this was originally done as a spiral down into the armbar on the floor, but Sutrisno Sensei changed it for a faster takedown.

 

            This technique can be paralled with SunNuSu kata.

 

Aikido 2 – Modified Version

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

Here the top of the left hand touches the back of the wrist of the parrying arm. This promotes greater stability, and quicker response time for both techniques.

The right foot slides up alongside the left, as you rotate 90 degrees to the right, your right hand slides down their arm and grasps their wrist, as your left vertical knife hand is pressed against the back of their arm/shoulder, at the crease.

Your right hand pulls them very slightly forward.

Throw a left front kick past their lead leg, and then use the snap back to quickly shift their leg back, and drop to your left knee, with an arm bar (pressing into the ground) takedown.

Essentially they punch and you put their face on the ground.

 

 

This new modification is using the augmented punch concept from Seiunchin.

 

Aikido 3 – Original Version

 

1.         Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

     As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

Pivoting on the ball of the left foot

The right open hand slides down to the wrist, grabs and pulls slightly forward.

The left hand cups behind (underneath) the opponent’s elbow)

As you turn 180 clockwise, you want the front hand to press down as the right hand presses up.

Theoretically a projection, but if done incorrectly , slams the opponents face towards the ground, locking them up.

 

Sensei Sutrisno was able to catch a punching/striking hand and project that person with this technique. His application of pain moved the body into the throw before the pain actualized.

 

Aikido 3 – Modified Version

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

 As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

The right hand rotates clockwise, as you press the opponents arm down and circle it down and up (clockwise) to catch their punching hand wrist in your left hand.

You then take your right open back hand and slap into the side of their neck, as their arm is pulled forward. This causes their head to shy away.

You hook your right open hand behind their neck and press forward on the other side of their neck.

As your right arm touches their neck and pulls their head back to your waist, your left hand rotates out and away (clockwise).

This creates a spiral effect sitting your opponent directly in front of your feet.

The obvious follow-up technique is a descending strike.

 

 

This modification came from Sutrisno Sensei himself.  His students were not being correct with the original (the attacker was punching upwards to make it easier to control and throw your opponent. So he modified it to something more workable.

 

                        This technique maps to the first stepping movement on the 2nd row of

Seisan. The technique in step 4, can be used as a knock-out technique, too. (Inspired by Sherman Harrill’s teaching).

 

 

Aikido 4 – Original Technique

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

While facing 12 o’clock, turn the right hand over (counter-clockwise) and press the attackers arm down and back (moving in a clockwise circle). Their arm momentum cannot stop this.

When their arm has rotated about 180 degrees, you shift hands, your left open hand coming up underneath their rising  right arm.

Once the left palm takes control, rotate 180 degrees clock-ward on the balls of your feet,  as you project your left hand in a half circle over your head for a projection takedown.

It is the shoulder rotation which is the projecting mechanism.

 

This is a great projection, but very high tech. If you don’t possess perfect timing you will instead drive the attacker down on an off plane.

 

Aikido 4 – Modified Technique

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

While facing 12 o’clock, turn the right hand over (counter-clockwise) and press the attackers arm down and back (moving in a clockwise circle). Their arm momentum cannot stop this.

When their arm has rotated about 180 degrees, you shift hands, your left open hand coming up underneath their rising right arm.

Once you’ve grasped their wrist, slide your right hand back over the opponents triceps insertion.

Pull both hands back and down. This will drive the opponents face down.

 

This ending now parallels Chinto kata, using a wrist lock and an armbar together.

 

 

Aikido 5 – Original Technique

 

Left foot forward (interior line of defense), raising both straight arms  up (from the right).

The left arm rests across the opponents biceps, the right harm across their neck.

Step around their lead leg with your right leg.

Rotate 180 degrees to the left, dropping down on your right knee.

 

The faster they strike, the faster they’re looking at the stars. This is a variation of Aikido’s Heaven and Earth throw.  It is also paralleled with technique from SunNuSu kata.

 

I didn’t modify this technique, except in theory.  The movement itself is perfection. But instead of the takedown, by changing the angle of the strike to the neck, this can obviously be a knock out, too.

 

Aikido 6 – Original Technique

 

Left foot forward with a left inner parry.

Your right hand comes up underneath their arm, and grabs their wrist from underneath.

Your right foot steps behind your left, moving their body 180 degrees, as your right hand pulls up and over.

When you’ve rotated and are ready to step forward (away from them from behind), drop your elbow (to stop their counter rotation out of this).

This can be a lock, a projection, or other nasty things. This movement comes from Aiki Jutsuo’s Shi Ho Nage (4 direction throw).

 


Aikido 6 – Modified Technique

 

Left foot forward and from the outside, use a left inner parry (across their forearm) moving them inward.

Lay your right on top of your left forearm (directly from Chinto’s X’ block).

Having deflected the strike, separate your hands,

The left hand pulling back to grab their wrist

The right arm bending, and the right elbow sliding up

The elbow raises the attacking arm, as the right hand continues to grab their wrist.

Your right foot steps behind your left, moving their body 180 degrees, as your right hand pulls up and over.

When you’ve rotated and are ready to step forward (away from them from behind), drop your elbow (to stop their counter rotation out of this).

This can be a lock, a projection, or other nasty things. This movement comes from Aiki Jutsuo’s Shi Ho Nage (4 direction throw).

 

This modification is a better answer (I had worked up several others, previously) for the thrusting attack. It is deflecting it from outside, and then using the separation to move them into the fall or the breakdown.

 

This kata parallels movement from Chinto’s double x-blocks.

 

Aikido 7 – Original Technique

 

Left foot forward, with left inner parry (outside of attackers arm) and simultaneous right inner parry (inside of attackers arm).

The right arm slices into the biceps insertion (immediately  in a quick 1(l) 2® combination above the elbow). This can be done open hand, or closed fist (using the knuckle of the little finger for the strike).

Pull the left hand up and out, as your right hand slides free, and then presses up behind the elbow.

At this point their elbow is pointing straight up into the air. This is a very painful side lock which can injure the opponent.

Simply walk forward holding their arm up in the air.

 

Again, a prefect move doesn’t need correction. What I did do was experiment with the initial right strike. Shown the open hand, I discovered how a closed fist little knuckle strike will actually open up the arm even quicker. A strange striking surface IMO.

 

Again a Chinto Kata parallel.


 

Aikido 8 – Original Technique.

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

The right foot slides up alongside the left, as you rotate 90 degrees to the right, your right hand slides down their arm and grasps their wrist, as your left vertical knife hand is pressed against the back of their arm/shoulder, at the crease.

Your right hand pulls them very slightly forward.

Grab their shoulder with your left hand

Simultaneously

Jerk their right shoulder back

Sweep your left foot in behind their lead leg

 

This is a very complex and subtle movement. I suspect Its somewhat related to some of the older judo kata with armor grappling techniques.

 

 

Aikido 8 – Modified Technique.

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

The right foot slides up alongside the left, as you rotate 90 degrees to the right, your right hand slides down their arm and grasps their wrist, as your left vertical knife hand is pressed against the back of their arm/shoulder, at the crease.

Your right hand pulls them very slightly forward.

Your left foot steps forward and behind the attacker.

Both hands grab their shoulders.

Once your right leg steps across, Press both hands slightly forward

Immediately snap them back and down, to drop the opponent.

 

A most dangerous version to practice, uses the head in a snap back/whiplash motion. This is too dangerous to practice, but it will certainly set the attacker down.

 

 

These techniques only represent the beginning of Aikido practice we incorporate, much of which parallels our kata technique too.

 

Some of these original techniques (notably No’s 3, 4 and 8) are exceptionally difficult to learn to do correctly. If one does get them there’s a really advanced level of body movement gained. But they (especially in our modified form) form the basis for our grappling skills development.

 

Even more important, we also work on countering these techniques being done to us, too.


 Footnotes:

 

The use of the stepping punch is a standard beginners training device, to first build up the technique. As the individual advances, exploration of other strikes (such as the reverse punch) are explored.  Where on the surface this type of punch seems very unreaslistic, in reality it is a training tool. Replacing that punching hand with a grabbing hand, as a precedessor to a strike, works just as fine.

 

But when our studies led us to realize the original attacks were likely tanto (Japanese knife) thrusts (which is backed up with very similar empty hand knife defense in Nakasone’s ‘Encyclopedia of Karate’ from the late 1930’s)

 

Eventually different angles, and speeds are employed to parallel realism to some extent.

 

Standard of Practice:

 

            While these techniques can be practiced individually, the advanced format requires you to be in the center of 8 attackers. They attack one after another, and each technique ends in a projection or pinning technique. Then pick up the speed of each attack.. You’re working on coming off the floor as quickly as possible, rising into the attack and finishing it.

 

            The uke line up pattern is something like this. (x marking the defenders spot)

 

 

7          1          4

           

5          x          6         

 

3          2          8