Monday, December 14, 2015

Black Belt Training 10-26-2002


 
Looking at past notes helps us remember where we have been. In this case the notes contains descriptions of the aikido drills I learned from Tristan Sutrisno, back in 1980 and then modifications he had made subsequently to the drill for his students around 1990. Of course since that time there have been several later modifications made by me, each to promote better student learning. The techniques are not completely Aikido in nature, but a blend of Aiki and karate. Entering and controlling the attack is the most important skill for the student.
 

The older version of the youth drills, which began at green belt and continued through black belt preparation.


Black Belt Classes 10/19,26/2002

 

Aging in one’s art is a reality. As my adult group are in our late 40’s through 60’s addressing our maturing needs to maintain quality training, but at the same time not destroy ourselves at the same time, is a logical goal.

 

Our arts offer a somewhat wider range than ‘pure’ Isshinryu, but one thing which is weathering quite well is our Isshinryu.  Most specifically continuing to concentrate on Mr. Lewis’ variation on the lower body chart, Isshinryu kicking continues to become more valuable, directed to lower body targets.

 

But what I’ve been concentrating on have been the basic Aikido training from Tris Sutrisno which we incorporate into our Brown Belt studies.

 

Our research makes us believe these Aikido practices originally arose out of Tanto (knife) self defense. As good aikido does, the attacker removes themselves out of a desire to get away from the pain (real or perceived) from the technique execution.

 

These variations are rather high tech, incorporating very rapid takedowns (which for the aging of us, become problematic, when we on longer choose to readily drop to our knees during the control/lockdown phase of the techniques.  Great aikido execution, good techniques especially for the younger MA.

 

My inclusion of these Aikido techniques fits several directions in by brown belt program.

 

First in that I don’t formally get into application of Isshinryu kata until after black belt. The aikido program allows my student to develop ‘basic’ manipulation skills. 

Second, these skills teach very exacting body shifting, which adds another layer into a student’s movement abilities.

Third, each technique is a great skill in their own right.  The student learning to enter an attack and flow through the attacker, with the minimal amount of force creates greater awareness of technique possibilities. This makes it easier to understand some of the later lessons from Isshirnyu application study.

 

But now I’m re-working them to keep them relevant for our group, and our capabilities.

The funny thing is, the more I do this, the greater the relevance to my Isshinryu I find.

 

The major change I’ve worked with was the manner in which the original techniques were ridden down into the ground, and have learned to map them to our Isshinryu kata.

 

That last statement is one important lesson. When I’ve been shown something it seems to lock into my brain, and takes great effort (often decades) to break out that other things are present.

 

Following are the original Aikido techniques and the ‘modifications’


All of the Uke (attackers) are stepping in with the right hand and  throwing a right punch (1).

 

Aikido 1 – original

 

Pivot 90 degrees to the left (on both feet) allowing the punch to slide past you. Your right hand flows on top of their arm/wrist.

Take your left hand and reach up underneath the attackers wrist.

Using both hands, circle your arms up (clockwise) and roll the attacker over your body to end up in a bent wrist lock (Aikido’s NiKyu).

Right front kick their face (or safer their abdomen).

Pivot 90 degrees to the left (on the ball of the left foot) and throw a right front kick past their leg, and snap it back (behind their lead leg) to drop to the floor on your right knee. This cuts their leg out and they go down on their back.

Holding their elbow on the floor, crank their wrist clockwise till they give up.

 

Aikido 1 – new modification

 

Pivot 90 degrees to the left (on both feet) allowing the punch to slide past you. Your right hand flows on top of their arm/wrist.

Take your left hand and reach up underneath the attackers wrist.

Using both hands, circle your arms up (clockwise) and roll the attacker over your body to end up in a bent wrist lock (Aikido’s NiKyu).

Option 1, holding their bent wrist with both hands, press their straight arm right into their shoulder (socket). This will immobilize them and lock their face down into the floor.

Option 2, holding their bent wrist with both hands, step in with your left foot (towards their shoulder) and throw a left low block (forearm press) behind their elbow, immobilizing them among other options.

 

This modification has the advantage that you control them without the higher technology of the kick and drop lock.

 

The manner in which the arm is cleared across your body, speaks for a knife being in the hand. There are alternative versions which can enter NiKyu but don’t use the kicking takedown, either.

 

Aikido 1 maps to SunUuSu Kata.  It also uses the double ball of the foot shifting as found in Annaku Kata.

 

Aikido 2 – Original

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

The right foot slides up alongside the left, as you rotate 90 degrees to the right, your right hand slides down their arm and grasps their wrist, as your left vertical knife hand is pressed against the back of their arm/shoulder, at the crease.

Your right hand pulls them very slightly forward.

Throw a left front kick past their lead leg, and then use the snap back to quickly shift their leg back, and drop to your left knee, with an arm bar (pressing into the ground) takedown.

Essentially they punch and you put their face on the ground.

 

[Note: this was originally done as a spiral down into the armbar on the floor, but Sutrisno Sensei changed it for a faster takedown.

 

            This technique can be paralled with SunNuSu kata.

 

Aikido 2 – Modified Version

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

Here the top of the left hand touches the back of the wrist of the parrying arm. This promotes greater stability, and quicker response time for both techniques.

The right foot slides up alongside the left, as you rotate 90 degrees to the right, your right hand slides down their arm and grasps their wrist, as your left vertical knife hand is pressed against the back of their arm/shoulder, at the crease.

Your right hand pulls them very slightly forward.

Throw a left front kick past their lead leg, and then use the snap back to quickly shift their leg back, and drop to your left knee, with an arm bar (pressing into the ground) takedown.

Essentially they punch and you put their face on the ground.

 

 

This new modification is using the augmented punch concept from Seiunchin.

 

Aikido 3 – Original Version

 

1.         Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

     As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

Pivoting on the ball of the left foot

The right open hand slides down to the wrist, grabs and pulls slightly forward.

The left hand cups behind (underneath) the opponent’s elbow)

As you turn 180 clockwise, you want the front hand to press down as the right hand presses up.

Theoretically a projection, but if done incorrectly , slams the opponents face towards the ground, locking them up.

 

Sensei Sutrisno was able to catch a punching/striking hand and project that person with this technique. His application of pain moved the body into the throw before the pain actualized.

 

Aikido 3 – Modified Version

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

 As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

The right hand rotates clockwise, as you press the opponents arm down and circle it down and up (clockwise) to catch their punching hand wrist in your left hand.

You then take your right open back hand and slap into the side of their neck, as their arm is pulled forward. This causes their head to shy away.

You hook your right open hand behind their neck and press forward on the other side of their neck.

As your right arm touches their neck and pulls their head back to your waist, your left hand rotates out and away (clockwise).

This creates a spiral effect sitting your opponent directly in front of your feet.

The obvious follow-up technique is a descending strike.

 

 

This modification came from Sutrisno Sensei himself.  His students were not being correct with the original (the attacker was punching upwards to make it easier to control and throw your opponent. So he modified it to something more workable.

 

                        This technique maps to the first stepping movement on the 2nd row of

Seisan. The technique in step 4, can be used as a knock-out technique, too. (Inspired by Sherman Harrill’s teaching).

 

 

Aikido 4 – Original Technique

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

While facing 12 o’clock, turn the right hand over (counter-clockwise) and press the attackers arm down and back (moving in a clockwise circle). Their arm momentum cannot stop this.

When their arm has rotated about 180 degrees, you shift hands, your left open hand coming up underneath their rising  right arm.

Once the left palm takes control, rotate 180 degrees clock-ward on the balls of your feet,  as you project your left hand in a half circle over your head for a projection takedown.

It is the shoulder rotation which is the projecting mechanism.

 

This is a great projection, but very high tech. If you don’t possess perfect timing you will instead drive the attacker down on an off plane.

 

Aikido 4 – Modified Technique

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

While facing 12 o’clock, turn the right hand over (counter-clockwise) and press the attackers arm down and back (moving in a clockwise circle). Their arm momentum cannot stop this.

When their arm has rotated about 180 degrees, you shift hands, your left open hand coming up underneath their rising right arm.

Once you’ve grasped their wrist, slide your right hand back over the opponents triceps insertion.

Pull both hands back and down. This will drive the opponents face down.

 

This ending now parallels Chinto kata, using a wrist lock and an armbar together.

 

 

Aikido 5 – Original Technique

 

Left foot forward (interior line of defense), raising both straight arms  up (from the right).

The left arm rests across the opponents biceps, the right harm across their neck.

Step around their lead leg with your right leg.

Rotate 180 degrees to the left, dropping down on your right knee.

 

The faster they strike, the faster they’re looking at the stars. This is a variation of Aikido’s Heaven and Earth throw.  It is also paralleled with technique from SunNuSu kata.

 

I didn’t modify this technique, except in theory.  The movement itself is perfection. But instead of the takedown, by changing the angle of the strike to the neck, this can obviously be a knock out, too.

 

Aikido 6 – Original Technique

 

Left foot forward with a left inner parry.

Your right hand comes up underneath their arm, and grabs their wrist from underneath.

Your right foot steps behind your left, moving their body 180 degrees, as your right hand pulls up and over.

When you’ve rotated and are ready to step forward (away from them from behind), drop your elbow (to stop their counter rotation out of this).

This can be a lock, a projection, or other nasty things. This movement comes from Aiki Jutsuo’s Shi Ho Nage (4 direction throw).

 


Aikido 6 – Modified Technique

 

Left foot forward and from the outside, use a left inner parry (across their forearm) moving them inward.

Lay your right on top of your left forearm (directly from Chinto’s X’ block).

Having deflected the strike, separate your hands,

The left hand pulling back to grab their wrist

The right arm bending, and the right elbow sliding up

The elbow raises the attacking arm, as the right hand continues to grab their wrist.

Your right foot steps behind your left, moving their body 180 degrees, as your right hand pulls up and over.

When you’ve rotated and are ready to step forward (away from them from behind), drop your elbow (to stop their counter rotation out of this).

This can be a lock, a projection, or other nasty things. This movement comes from Aiki Jutsuo’s Shi Ho Nage (4 direction throw).

 

This modification is a better answer (I had worked up several others, previously) for the thrusting attack. It is deflecting it from outside, and then using the separation to move them into the fall or the breakdown.

 

This kata parallels movement from Chinto’s double x-blocks.

 

Aikido 7 – Original Technique

 

Left foot forward, with left inner parry (outside of attackers arm) and simultaneous right inner parry (inside of attackers arm).

The right arm slices into the biceps insertion (immediately  in a quick 1(l) 2® combination above the elbow). This can be done open hand, or closed fist (using the knuckle of the little finger for the strike).

Pull the left hand up and out, as your right hand slides free, and then presses up behind the elbow.

At this point their elbow is pointing straight up into the air. This is a very painful side lock which can injure the opponent.

Simply walk forward holding their arm up in the air.

 

Again, a prefect move doesn’t need correction. What I did do was experiment with the initial right strike. Shown the open hand, I discovered how a closed fist little knuckle strike will actually open up the arm even quicker. A strange striking surface IMO.

 

Again a Chinto Kata parallel.


 

Aikido 8 – Original Technique.

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

The right foot slides up alongside the left, as you rotate 90 degrees to the right, your right hand slides down their arm and grasps their wrist, as your left vertical knife hand is pressed against the back of their arm/shoulder, at the crease.

Your right hand pulls them very slightly forward.

Grab their shoulder with your left hand

Simultaneously

Jerk their right shoulder back

Sweep your left foot in behind their lead leg

 

This is a very complex and subtle movement. I suspect Its somewhat related to some of the older judo kata with armor grappling techniques.

 

 

Aikido 8 – Modified Technique.

 

Left foot forward (outside the striking arm) stepping right alongside the opponents lead foot.

As this happens the right open inside block is executed (left hand in chamber).

The right foot slides up alongside the left, as you rotate 90 degrees to the right, your right hand slides down their arm and grasps their wrist, as your left vertical knife hand is pressed against the back of their arm/shoulder, at the crease.

Your right hand pulls them very slightly forward.

Your left foot steps forward and behind the attacker.

Both hands grab their shoulders.

Once your right leg steps across, Press both hands slightly forward

Immediately snap them back and down, to drop the opponent.

 

A most dangerous version to practice, uses the head in a snap back/whiplash motion. This is too dangerous to practice, but it will certainly set the attacker down.

 

 

These techniques only represent the beginning of Aikido practice we incorporate, much of which parallels our kata technique too.

 

Some of these original techniques (notably No’s 3, 4 and 8) are exceptionally difficult to learn to do correctly. If one does get them there’s a really advanced level of body movement gained. But they (especially in our modified form) form the basis for our grappling skills development.

 

Even more important, we also work on countering these techniques being done to us, too.


 Footnotes:

 

The use of the stepping punch is a standard beginners training device, to first build up the technique. As the individual advances, exploration of other strikes (such as the reverse punch) are explored.  Where on the surface this type of punch seems very unreaslistic, in reality it is a training tool. Replacing that punching hand with a grabbing hand, as a precedessor to a strike, works just as fine.

 

But when our studies led us to realize the original attacks were likely tanto (Japanese knife) thrusts (which is backed up with very similar empty hand knife defense in Nakasone’s ‘Encyclopedia of Karate’ from the late 1930’s)

 

Eventually different angles, and speeds are employed to parallel realism to some extent.

 

Standard of Practice:

 

            While these techniques can be practiced individually, the advanced format requires you to be in the center of 8 attackers. They attack one after another, and each technique ends in a projection or pinning technique. Then pick up the speed of each attack.. You’re working on coming off the floor as quickly as possible, rising into the attack and finishing it.

 

            The uke line up pattern is something like this. (x marking the defenders spot)

 

 

7          1          4

           

5          x          6         

 

3          2          8

 

 


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